Research Papers: Sensing

Infrared spectroscopy reveals both qualitative and quantitative differences in equine subchondral bone during maturation

[+] Author Affiliations
Yevgeniya Kobrina, Hanna Isaksson

University of Eastern Finland, Department of Physics and Mathematics, Kuopio, Finland 70211

Miikka Sinisaari

University of Eastern Finland, Department of Biomedicine, Kuopio, Finland 70211

Lassi Rieppo

University of Eastern Finland, Department of Physics and Mathematics, Kuopio, Finland 70211

Pieter A. Brama

University College Dublin, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary, Medicine Belfrield, Dublin 4, Ireland

René van Weeren

Utrecht University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Equine Sciences, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands

Heikki J. Helminen

University of Eastern Finland, Department of Biomedicine, Kuopio, Finland 70211

Jukka S. Jurvelin

University of Eastern Finland, Department of Physics and Mathematics, Kuopio, Finland 70211

Simo Saarakkala

University of Eastern Finland, Department of Physics and Mathematics, Kuopio, Finland 70211 and University of Oulu, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu, Finland 90014

J. Biomed. Opt. 15(6), 067003 (November 29, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3512177
History: Received April 15, 2010; Revised August 25, 2010; Accepted September 23, 2010; Published November 29, 2010; Online November 29, 2010
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The collagen phase in bone is known to undergo major changes during growth and maturation. The objective of this study is to clarify whether Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, coupled with cluster analysis, can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone in horses during maturation and growth. Equine subchondral bone samples (n = 29) from the proximal joint surface of the first phalanx are prepared from two sites subjected to different loading conditions. Three age groups are studied: newborn (0 days old), immature (5 to 11 months old), and adult (6 to 10 years old) horses. Spatial collagen content and collagen cross-link ratio are quantified from the spectra. Additionally, normalized second derivative spectra of samples are clustered using the k-means clustering algorithm. In quantitative analysis, collagen content in the subchondral bone increases rapidly between the newborn and immature horses. The collagen cross-link ratio increases significantly with age. In qualitative analysis, clustering is able to separate newborn and adult samples into two different groups. The immature samples display some nonhomogeneity. In conclusion, this is the first study showing that FTIR spectral imaging combined with clustering techniques can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone during growth and maturation.

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© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Yevgeniya Kobrina ; Hanna Isaksson ; Miikka Sinisaari ; Lassi Rieppo ; Pieter A. Brama, et al.
"Infrared spectroscopy reveals both qualitative and quantitative differences in equine subchondral bone during maturation", J. Biomed. Opt. 15(6), 067003 (November 29, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3512177


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