Special Section on Pioneers in Biomedical Optics: Michael Feld

Optical techniques for tracking multiple myeloma engraftment, growth, and response to therapy

[+] Author Affiliations
Judith M. Runnels

Massachusetts General Hospital, Wellman Center for Photomedicine and Center for Systems Biology, Advanced Microscopy Program, Boston, Massachusetts 02114

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medical Oncology, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Alicia L. Carlson, Charles P. Lin

Massachusetts General Hospital, Wellman Center for Photomedicine and Center for Systems Biology, Advanced Microscopy Program, Boston, Massachusetts 02114

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Costas Pitsillides, Brian Thompson, Juwell Wu, Joel A. Spencer, John M. J. Kohler

Massachusetts General Hospital, Wellman Center for Photomedicine and Center for Systems Biology, Advanced Microscopy Program, Boston, Massachusetts 02114

AbdelKareem Azab, Anne-Sophie Moreau

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medical Oncology, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Scott J. Rodig

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Pathology, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Andrew L. Kung

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Dana-Faber Cancer Institute, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Children's Hospital, Department of Hematology/Oncology, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Kenneth C. Anderson, Irene M. Ghobrial

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medical Oncology, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(1), 011006 (January 11, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3520571
History: Received April 09, 2010; Revised August 02, 2010; Accepted August 04, 2010; Published January 11, 2011; Online January 11, 2011
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Multiple myeloma (MM), the second most common hematological malignancy, initiates from a single site and spreads via circulation to multiple sites in the bone marrow (BM). Methods to track MM cells both in the BM and circulation would be useful for developing new therapeutic strategies to target MM cell spread. We describe the use of complementary optical techniques to track human MM cells expressing both bioluminescent and fluorescent reporters in a mouse xenograft model. Long-term tumor growth and response to therapy are monitored using bioluminescence imaging (BLI), while numbers of circulating tumor cells are detected by in-vivo flow cytometry. Intravital microscopy is used to detect early seeding of MM cells to the BM, as well as residual cancer cells that remain in the BM after the bulk of the tumor is eradicated following drug treatment. Thus, intravital microscopy provides a powerful, albeit invasive, means to study cellular processes in vivo at the very early stage of the disease process and at the very late stage of therapeutic intervention when the tumor burden is too small to be detected by other imaging methods.

Figures in this Article
© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Judith M. Runnels ; Alicia L. Carlson ; Costas Pitsillides ; Brian Thompson ; Juwell Wu, et al.
"Optical techniques for tracking multiple myeloma engraftment, growth, and response to therapy", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(1), 011006 (January 11, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3520571


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