Special Section on Pioneers in Biomedical Optics: Michael Feld

Multimodal spectroscopy detects features of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque

[+] Author Affiliations
Obrad R. Šćepanović, Chae-Ryon Kong, Zoya Volynskaya, Ramachandra R. Dasari, John R. Kramer, Michael S. Feld

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, George R. Harrison Spectroscopy Laboratory, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

Maryann Fitzmaurice

Case Western Reserve University, Department of Pathology, Cleveland, Ohio 44106

Arnold Miller

MetroWest Medical Center, Department of Vascular Surgery, Natick, Massachusetts 01760

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(1), 011009 (January 20, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3525287
History: Received April 01, 2010; Revised August 23, 2010; Accepted August 25, 2010; Published January 20, 2011; Online January 20, 2011
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Early detection and treatment of rupture-prone vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is critical to reducing patient mortality associated with cardiovascular disease. The combination of reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopy—termed multimodal spectroscopy (MMS)—provides detailed biochemical information about tissue and can detect vulnerable plaque features: thin fibrous cap (TFC), necrotic core (NC), superficial foam cells (SFC), and thrombus. Ex vivo MMS spectra are collected from 12 patients that underwent carotid endarterectomy or femoral bypass surgery. Data are collected by means of a unitary MMS optical fiber probe and a portable clinical instrument. Blinded histopathological analysis is used to assess the vulnerability of each spectrally evaluated artery lesion. Modeling of the ex vivo MMS spectra produce objective parameters that correlate with the presence of vulnerable plaque features: TFC with fluorescence parameters indicative of collagen presence; NC/SFC with a combination of diffuse reflectance β-carotene/ceroid absorption and the Raman spectral signature of lipids; and thrombus with its Raman signature. Using these parameters, suspected vulnerable plaques can be detected with a sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 72%. These encouraging results warrant the continued development of MMS as a catheter-based clinical diagnostic technique for early detection of vulnerable plaques.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Obrad R. Šćepanović ; Maryann Fitzmaurice ; Arnold Miller ; Chae-Ryon Kong ; Zoya Volynskaya, et al.
"Multimodal spectroscopy detects features of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(1), 011009 (January 20, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3525287


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