Special Section on Coherent Raman Imaging Techniques and Biomedical Applications

Label-free imaging of biomolecules in food products using stimulated Raman microscopy

[+] Author Affiliations
Maarten B. J. Roeffaers, Brian G. Saar, X. Sunney Xie

Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138

Xu Zhang

Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138

Harvard University, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138

Christian W. Freudiger

Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138

Harvard University, Department of Physics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138

Marjolein van Ruijven, Gerard van Dalen

Unilever Research and Development, Advanced Measurement and Data Modelling, 3133AT Vlaardingen, Netherlands

Chunhong Xiao

Unilever Research and Development, Advanced Measurement and Data Modelling, Trumbull, Connecticut 06611

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(2), 021118 (February 02, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3516591
History: Received August 23, 2010; Revised September 29, 2010; Accepted September 30, 2010; Published February 02, 2011; Online February 02, 2011
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The development of methods that allow microscale studies of complex biomaterials based on their molecular composition is of great interest to a wide range of research fields. We show that stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is an excellent analytical tool to study distributions of different biomolecules in multiphasic systems. SRS combines the label-free molecular specificity of vibrational spectroscopy with an enhanced sensitivity due to coherent excitation of molecular vibrations. Compared to previous imaging studies using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy, the main advantage of SRS microscopy is the absence of the unwanted nonresonant background, which translates into a superior sensitivity and undistorted vibrational spectra. We compare spectra of complex materials obtained with stimulated Raman scattering and spontaneous Raman scattering in the crowded fingerprint region. We find that, as expected, there is excellent correspondence and that the SRS spectra are free from interference from background fluorescence. In addition, we show high-resolution imaging of the distributions of selected biomolecules, such as lipids and proteins, in food products with SRS microscopy.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Maarten B. J. Roeffaers ; Xu Zhang ; Christian W. Freudiger ; Brian G. Saar ; Marjolein van Ruijven, et al.
"Label-free imaging of biomolecules in food products using stimulated Raman microscopy", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(2), 021118 (February 02, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3516591


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