Research Papers: Imaging

Photoacoustic tomography of ex vivo mouse hearts with myocardial infarction

[+] Author Affiliations
Markus Holotta, Christian Kremser, Pavle Torbica, Gerald Degenhart, Regina Esterhammer, Werner Jaschke

Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria

Harald Grossauer

University of Innsbruck, Department of Mathematics, Technikerstraße 15, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria

Jakob Völkl

Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Internal Medicine – Cardiology, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria

Robert Nuster

Karl-Franzens-University Graz, Department of Physics, Hafenstraße 47-51, 4020 Linz, Austria

RECENDT GmbH, Department of Sensor Technology, Universitätsplatz 5, 8010 Graz, Austria

Günther Paltauf

Karl-Franzens-University Graz, Department of Physics, Hafenstraße 47-51, 4020 Linz, Austria

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(3), 036007 (March 09, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3556720
History: Received November 26, 2010; Revised January 21, 2011; Accepted January 27, 2011; Published March 09, 2011; Online March 09, 2011
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In the present study, we evaluated the applicability of ex vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) on small animal organs. We used photoacoustic tomography (PAT) to visualize infarcted areas within murine hearts and compared these data to other imaging techniques [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), micro-computed tomography] and histological slices. In order to induce ischemia, an in vivo ligation of the left anterior descending artery was performed on nine wild-type mice. After varying survival periods, the hearts were excised and fixed in formaldehyde. Samples were illuminated with nanosecond laser pulses delivered by a Nd:YAG pumped optical parametric oscillator. Ultrasound detection was achieved using a Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI) working as an integrating line detector. The voxel data were computed using a Fourier-domain based reconstruction algorithm, followed by inverse Radon transforms. The results clearly showed the capability of PAI to visualize myocardial infarction and to produce three-dimensional images with a spatial resolution of approximately 120 μm. Regions of affected muscle tissue in PAI corresponded well with the results of MRI and histology. Photoacoustic tomography utilizing a MZI for ultrasound detection allows for imaging of small tissue samples. Due to its high spatial resolution, good soft tissue contrast and comparatively low cost, PAT offers great potentials for imaging.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Markus Holotta ; Harald Grossauer ; Christian Kremser ; Pavle Torbica ; Jakob Völkl, et al.
"Photoacoustic tomography of ex vivo mouse hearts with myocardial infarction", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(3), 036007 (March 09, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3556720


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