Research Papers: Sensing

Compact point-detection fluorescence spectroscopy system for quantifying intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio in brain cancer diagnostics

[+] Author Affiliations
Quan Liu

Nanyang Technological University, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, N1.3-B2–06, 70 Nanyang Drive, Singapore, 637457 Singapore

Gerald Grant, Shuqin Li, Christy Wilson

Duke University, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Room 4521, Blue Zone, Box 3272, Durham, North Carolina 27710

Jianjun Li, Darell Bigner

Duke University, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, Department of Pathology, 177 MSRB, Box 3156, Research Drive, North Carolina 27710

Yan Zhang, Fangyao Hu

Duke University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 136 Hudson Hall, Box 90281, Durham, North Carolina 27708–0281

Kui Chen

Louisiana State University in Shreveport, Department of Chemistry and Physics, College of Sciences, SC-326, One University Place, Science Building, Shreveport, Louisiana 71115

Tuan Vo-Dinh

Duke University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 136 Hudson Hall, Box 90281, Durham, North Carolina 27708–0281

Duke University, Department of Chemistry, 136 Hudson Hall, Box 90281, Durham, North Carolina 27708–0281

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(3), 037004 (March 18, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3558840
History: Received July 05, 2010; Accepted January 19, 2010; Accepted February 03, 2011; Published March 18, 2011; Online March 18, 2011
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We report the development of a compact point-detection fluorescence spectroscopy system and two data analysis methods to quantify the intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio and diagnose brain cancer in an orthotopic brain tumor rat model. Our system employs one compact cw diode laser (407 nm) to excite two primary endogenous fluorophores, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide. The spectra were first analyzed using a spectral filtering modulation method developed previously to derive the intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio, which has the advantages of insensitivty to optical coupling and rapid data acquisition and analysis. This method represents a convenient and rapid alternative for achieving intrinsic fluorescence-based redox measurements as compared to those complicated model-based methods. It is worth noting that the method can also extract total hemoglobin concentration at the same time but only if the emission path length of fluorescence light, which depends on the illumination and collection geometry of the optical probe, is long enough so that the effect of absorption on fluorescence intensity due to hemoglobin is significant. Then a multivariate method was used to statistically classify normal tissues and tumors. Although the first method offers quantitative tissue metabolism information, the second method provides high overall classification accuracy. The two methods provide complementary capabilities for understanding cancer development and noninvasively diagnosing brain cancer. The results of our study suggest that this portable system can be potentially used to demarcate the elusive boundary between a brain tumor and the surrounding normal tissue during surgical resection.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Quan Liu ; Gerald Grant ; Jianjun Li ; Yan Zhang ; Fangyao Hu, et al.
"Compact point-detection fluorescence spectroscopy system for quantifying intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio in brain cancer diagnostics", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(3), 037004 (March 18, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3558840


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