Special Section on Photonics and Nanotechnology in Biophysics and Biomedical Research

Effect of polyethylene glycol coatings on uptake of indocyanine green loaded nanocapsules by human spleen macrophages in vitro

[+] Author Affiliations
Baharak Bahmani, Sharad Gupta, Bahman Anvari

University of California, Riverside, Department of Bioengineering, Riverside, California 92521

Srigokul Upadhyayula

University of California, Riverside, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Riverside, California 92521

Valentine I. Vullev

University of California, Riverside, Department of Bioengineering, Riverside, California 92521

University of California, Riverside, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Riverside, California 92521

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(5), 051303 (May 10, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3574761
History: Received October 14, 2010; Revised January 11, 2011; Accepted January 12, 2011; Published May 10, 2011; Online May 10, 2011
Text Size: A A A

Near-infrared (NIR) optically active nanoparticles are promising exogenous chromophores for applications in medical imaging and phototherapy. Since nanoparticles can be rapidly eliminated from the body by cells of the reticuloendothelial system, a thriving strategy to increase their blood circulation time is through surface modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG). We constructed polymeric nanocapsules loaded with indocyanine green (ICG), an FDA-approved NIR dye, and coated with aldehyde-terminated PEG. Using optical absorbance spectroscopy and flow cytometry, we investigated the effect of PEG coating and molecular weight (MW) of PEG [5000 and 30,000 Daltons (Da)] on the phagocytic content of human spleen macrophages incubated with ICG-containing nanocapsules (ICG-NCs) between 15 to 360 min. Our results indicate that surface coating with PEG is an effective method to reduce the phagocytic content of ICG-NCs within macrophages for at least up to 360 min of incubation time. Coating the surface of ICG-NCs with the low MW PEG results in lower phagocytic content of ICG-NCs within macrophages for at least up to 60 min of incubation time as compared to ICG-NCs coated with the high MW PEG. Surface coating of ICG-NCs with PEG is a promising approach to prolong vasculature circulation time of ICG for NIR imaging and phototherapeutic applications.

Figures in this Article
© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Baharak Bahmani ; Sharad Gupta ; Srigokul Upadhyayula ; Valentine I. Vullev and Bahman Anvari
"Effect of polyethylene glycol coatings on uptake of indocyanine green loaded nanocapsules by human spleen macrophages in vitro", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(5), 051303 (May 10, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3574761


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement


 

  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.