Special Section on Photonics and Nanotechnology in Biophysics and Biomedical Research

Optical properties of breast tumor phantoms containing carbon nanotubes and nanohorns

[+] Author Affiliations
Saugata Sarkar

Virginia Tech, Department of Mechanical Engineering, ICTAS Building, Stanger Street, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061

Abhijit A. Gurjarpadhye

Virginia Tech and Wake Forest University, School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061

Christopher G. Rylander, Marissa Nichole Rylander

Virginia Tech, Department of Mechanical Engineering, ICTAS Building, Stanger Street, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061

Virginia Tech and Wake Forest University, School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(5), 051304 (May 20, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3574762
History: Received November 04, 2010; Revised February 21, 2011; Accepted February 28, 2011; Published May 20, 2011; Online May 20, 2011
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The degree by which optical properties of tumors are altered following introduction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of varying concentration and type is poorly understood, making it difficult to predict the impact of CNT inclusion on the photothermal response to laser therapies. Optical properties were measured of phantoms representative of breast tumor tissue incorporated with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), and single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) of varying concentration (0.01–0.1 mg/ml). Tissue phantoms were made from sodium alginate (3 g/ml) incorporated with polystyrene microbeads (3 μm diam and 1 mg/ml) and talc-France powder (40 mg/ml). Absorption (μa) and reduced scattering (

μs) coefficients of phantoms containing CNTs were determined by the inverse adding-doubling algorithm for the wavelength range of 400–1300 nm. Optical properties of phantoms without CNTs were in the range of μa = 1.04–0.06 mm−1 and μs = 0.05–0.07 mm−1 at a wavelength of 900 nm, which corresponds with published data for human breast tumor tissue. Incorporating MWNTs, SWNTs, and SWNHs in phantoms with a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml increased (μa) by 20- to 30-fold, 5- to 6-fold, and 9- to 14-fold, respectively, for the wavelength range of 800–1100 nm with minimal change in μs (1.2- to 1.3-fold). Introduction of CNTs into tissue phantoms increased absorption, providing a means to enhance photothermal therapy.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Saugata Sarkar ; Abhijit A. Gurjarpadhye ; Christopher G. Rylander and Marissa Nichole Rylander
"Optical properties of breast tumor phantoms containing carbon nanotubes and nanohorns", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(5), 051304 (May 20, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3574762


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