Research Papers: Therapeutic

Feasibility of intrafraction whole-body motion tracking for total marrow irradiation

[+] Author Affiliations
Manju Sharma, Troy Dos Santos

University of Minnesota Medical School, Department of Therapeutic Radiology–Radiation Oncology, MMC 494–420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

Nikolaos P. Papanikolopoulos

University of Minnesota Medical School, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, MMC 494–420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

University of Minnesota Medical School, Biomedical Engineering, MMC 494–420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

Susanta Kumar Hui

University of Minnesota Medical School, Department of Therapeutic Radiology–Radiation Oncology, MMC 494–420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

University of Minnesota Medical School, Biomedical Engineering, MMC 494–420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

University of Minnesota Medical School, Biophysical Sciences and Medical Physics MMC 494–420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(5), 058002 (May 20, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3575645
History: Received July 22, 2010; Revised March 11, 2011; Accepted March 21, 2011; Published May 20, 2011; Online May 20, 2011
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With image-guided tomotherapy, highly targeted total marrow irradiation (TMI) has become a feasible alternative to conventional total body irradiation. The uncertainties in patient localization and intrafraction motion of the whole body during hour-long TMI treatment may pose a risk to the safety and accuracy of targeted radiation treatment. The feasibility of near-infrared markers and optical tracking system (OTS) is accessed along with a megavoltage scanning system of tomotherapy. Three near-infrared markers placed on the face of a rando phantom are used to evaluate the capability of OTS in measuring changes in the markers’ positions as the rando is moved in the translational direction. The OTS is also employed to determine breathing motion related changes in the position of 16 markers placed on the chest surface of human volunteers. The maximum uncertainty in locating marker position with the OTS is 1.5 mm. In the case of normal and deep breathing motion, the maximum marker position change is observed in anterior–posterior direction with the respective values of 4 and 12 mm. The OTS is able to measure surface changes due to breathing motion. The OTS may be optimized to monitor whole body motion during TMI to increase the accuracy of treatment delivery and reduce the radiation dose to the lungs.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Manju Sharma ; Troy Dos Santos ; Nikolaos P. Papanikolopoulos and Susanta Kumar Hui
"Feasibility of intrafraction whole-body motion tracking for total marrow irradiation", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(5), 058002 (May 20, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3575645


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