Research Papers: Sensing

Mitochondrial function and tissue vitality: bench-to-bedside real-time optical monitoring system

[+] Author Affiliations
Avraham Mayevsky

Bar-Ilan University, The Mina & Everard Goodman Faculty of Life-Sciences, Ramat-Gan, 52900 Israel

CritiSense Ltd., Givat Shmuel, 54101 Israel

Raphael Walden, Eitan Heldenberg

Sheba Medical Center, Department of Vascular Surgery, Tel-Hashomer, 52621 Israel

Eliyahu Pewzner, Assaf Deutsch

CritiSense Ltd., Givat Shmuel, 54101 Israel

Jacob Lavee, Salis Tager, Erez Kachel, Ehud Raanani

Sheba Medical Center, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Tel-Hashomer, 52621 Israel

Sergey Preisman, Violete Glauber

Sheba Medical Center, Departments of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Tel-Hashomer, 52621 Israel

Eran Segal

Assuta Medical Centers, Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Tel-Aviv, Israel

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(6), 067004 (June 13, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3585674
History: Received February 01, 2011; Revised April 07, 2011; Accepted April 08, 2011; Published June 13, 2011; Online June 13, 2011
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Background: The involvement of mitochondria in pathological states, such as neurodegenerative diseases, sepsis, stroke, and cancer, are well documented. Monitoring of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence in vivo as an intracellular oxygen indicator was established in 1950 to 1970 by Britton Chance and collaborators. We use a multiparametric monitoring system enabling assessment of tissue vitality. In order to use this technology in clinical practice, the commercial developed device, the CritiView (CRV), is tested in animal models as well as in patients. Methods and Results: The new CRV enables the optical monitoring of four different parameters, representing the energy balance of various tissues in vivo. Mitochondrial NADH is measured by surface fluorometry/reflectometry. In addition, tissue microcirculatory blood flow, tissue reflectance and oxygenation are measured as well. The device is tested both in vitro and in vivo in a small animal model and in preliminary clinical trials in patients undergoing vascular or open heart surgery. In patients, the monitoring is started immediately after the insertion of a three-way Foley catheter (urine collection) to the patient and is stopped when the patient is discharged from the operating room. The results show that monitoring the urethral wall vitality provides information in correlation to the surgical procedure performed.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Topics

Blood ; Tissues ; Oxygen

Citation

Avraham Mayevsky ; Raphael Walden ; Eliyahu Pewzner ; Assaf Deutsch ; Eitan Heldenberg, et al.
"Mitochondrial function and tissue vitality: bench-to-bedside real-time optical monitoring system", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(6), 067004 (June 13, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3585674


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