Special Section on Hard-Tissue Optics and Related Methods

Near-ultraviolet removal rates for subgingival dental calculus at different irradiation angles

[+] Author Affiliations
Joshua E. Schoenly

University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299

University of Rochester, The Institute of Optics, Wilmot Building, 275 Hutchison Road, Rochester, New York 14627-0186

University of California at San Francisco, School of Dentistry, Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, 707 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, California 94143

Wolf D. Seka

University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299

University of Rochester, The Institute of Optics, Wilmot Building, 275 Hutchison Road, Rochester, New York 14627-0186

Peter Rechmann

University of California at San Francisco, School of Dentistry, Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, 707 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, California 94143

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(7), 071404 (July 07, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3564907
History: Received September 30, 2010; Accepted December 03, 2010; Published July 07, 2011; Online July 07, 2011
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The laser ablation rate of subgingival dental calculus irradiated at a 400-nm-wavelength, 7.4-mJ pulse energy, and 85- and 20-deg irradiation angles is measured using laser triangulation. Three-dimensional images taken before and after irradiation create a removal map with 6-μm axial resolution. Fifteen human teeth with subgingival calculus are irradiated in vitro under a cooling water spray with an ∼300-μm-diam, tenth-order super-Gaussian beam. The average subgingival calculus removal rates for irradiation at 85 and 20 deg are 11.1±3.6 and 11.5±5.9 μm/pulse, respectively, for depth removal and 4.5±1.7×105 and 4.8±2.3×105 μm3/pulse, respectively, for volume removal. The ablation rate is constant at each irradiation site but varies between sites because of the large differences in the physical and optical properties of calculus. Comparison of the average depth- and volume-removal rates does not reveal any dependence on the irradiation angle and is likely due to the surface topology of subgingival calculus samples that overshadows any expected angular dependence.

Figures in this Article
© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Joshua E. Schoenly ; Wolf D. Seka and Peter Rechmann
"Near-ultraviolet removal rates for subgingival dental calculus at different irradiation angles", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(7), 071404 (July 07, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3564907


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