Research Papers: Imaging

Digital optical tomography system for dynamic breast imaging

[+] Author Affiliations
Molly L. Flexman, Michael A. Khalil, Hyun K. Kim, Christopher J. Fong

Columbia University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 351 Engineering Terrace, 1210 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, New York 10027

Rabah Al Abdi

State University of New York – Downstate Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Box 25, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 11203

Elise Desperito

Columbia University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, 630 West 168th Street, Box 28, New York, New York 10032

Dawn L. Hershman

Columbia University Medical Center, Department of Medicine – Oncology, Irving Pavilion, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, New York 10032

Randall L. Barbour

State University of New York – Downstate Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Box 25, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 11203

NIRx Medical Technologies LLC, Glen Head, New York 11545

Andreas H. Hielscher

Columbia University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 351 Engineering Terrace, 1210 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, New York 10027

Columbia University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, 630 West 168th Street, Box 28, New York, New York 10032

Columbia University, Department of Electrical Engineering, 1300 S.W. Mudd, 500 West 120th Street, New York, New York 10027

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(7), 076014 (July 13, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3599955
History: Received March 28, 2011; Revised May 19, 2011; Accepted May 23, 2011; Published July 13, 2011; Online July 13, 2011
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Diffuse optical tomography has shown promising results as a tool for breast cancer screening and monitoring response to chemotherapy. Dynamic imaging of the transient response of the breast to an external stimulus, such as pressure or a respiratory maneuver, can provide additional information that can be used to detect tumors. We present a new digital continuous-wave optical tomography system designed to simultaneously image both breasts at fast frame rates and with a large number of sources and detectors. The system uses a master-slave digital signal processor-based detection architecture to achieve a dynamic range of 160 dB and a frame rate of 1.7 Hz with 32 sources, 64 detectors, and 4 wavelengths per breast. Included is a preliminary study of one healthy patient and two breast cancer patients showing the ability to identify an invasive carcinoma based on the hemodynamic response to a breath hold.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Molly L. Flexman ; Michael A. Khalil ; Rabah Al Abdi ; Hyun K. Kim ; Christopher J. Fong, et al.
"Digital optical tomography system for dynamic breast imaging", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(7), 076014 (July 13, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3599955


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