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Research Papers: Imaging

Fluorescence lifetime imaging for the characterization of the biochemical composition of atherosclerotic plaques

[+] Author Affiliations
Jennifer Phipps, Yinghua Sun, Nisa Hatami, Laura Marcu

University of California, Davis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616

Ramez Saroufeem

University of California, Davis, Department of Medical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Health System, PATH Building, 4400 V Street, Sacramento, California 95817

Michael C. Fishbein

University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90095

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(9), 096018 (September 12, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3626865
History: Received February 14, 2011; Revised July 26, 2011; Accepted August 02, 2011; Published September 12, 2011; Online September 12, 2011
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This study investigates the ability of a flexible fiberoptic-based fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) technique to resolve biochemical features in plaque fibrotic cap associated with plaque instability and based solely on fluorescence decay characteristics. Autofluorescence of atherosclerotic human aorta (11 autopsy samples) was measured at 48 locations through two filters, F377: 377/50 and F460: 460/60 nm (center wavelength/bandwidth). The fluorescence decay dynamic was described by average lifetime (τ) and four Laguerre coefficients (LECs) retrieved through a Laguerre deconvolution technique. FLIM-derived parameters discriminated between four groups [elastin-rich (ER), elastin and macrophage-rich (E+M), collagen-rich (CR), and lipid-rich (LR)]. For example, τF377 discriminated ER from CR (R = 0.84); τF460 discriminated E+M from CR and ER (R = 0.60 and 0.54, respectively); LEC-1F377 discriminated CR from LR and E+M (R = 0.69 and 0.77, respectively); P < 0.05 for all correlations. Linear discriminant analysis was used to classify this data set with specificity >87% (all cases) and sensitivity as high as 86%. Current results demonstrate for the first time that clinically relevant features (e.g., ratios of lipid versus collagen versus elastin) can be evaluated with a flexible-fiber based FLIM technique without the need for fluorescence intensity information or contrast agents.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Jennifer Phipps ; Yinghua Sun ; Ramez Saroufeem ; Nisa Hatami ; Michael C. Fishbein, et al.
"Fluorescence lifetime imaging for the characterization of the biochemical composition of atherosclerotic plaques", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(9), 096018 (September 12, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3626865


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