Research Papers: Sensing

Analyzing near-infrared scattering from human skin to monitor changes in hematocrit

[+] Author Affiliations
Joseph Chaiken, Bin Deng

Syracuse University, Department of Chemistry, 1-014 Center for Science and Technology, Syracuse, New York 13244-4100

Syracuse University, Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, 121 Link Hall, Syracuse, New York 13244-4100

Jerry Goodisman

Syracuse University, Department of Chemistry, 1-014 Center for Science and Technology, Syracuse, New York 13244-4100

George Shaheen, Rebecca J. Bussjager

LighTouch Medical, Inc., 600 East Genesee Street, Suite 123, Syracuse, New York 13202-3130

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(9), 097005 (September 02, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3625283
History: Received June 11, 2011; Revised July 17, 2011; Accepted July 19, 2011; Published September 02, 2011; Online September 02, 2011
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Probing tissue with near-infrared radiation (NIR) simultaneously produces remitted fluorescence and Raman scattering (IE) plus Rayleigh/Mie light scattering (EE) that noninvasively give chemical and physical information about the materials and objects within. We model tissue as a three-phase system: plasma and red blood cell (RBC) phases that are mobile and a static tissue phase. In vivo, any volume of tissue naturally experiences spatial and temporal fluctuations of blood plasma and RBC content. Plasma and RBC fractions may be discriminated from each other on the basis of their physical, chemical, and optical properties. Thus, IE and EE from NIR probing yield information about these fractions. Assuming there is no void volume in viable tissue, or that void volume is constant, changes in plasma and RBC volume fractions may be calculated from simultaneous measurements of the two observables, EE and IE. In a previously published analysis we showed the underlying phenomenology but did not provide an algorithm for calculating volume fractions from experimental data. Now, we present a simple analysis that allows monitoring of fluid fraction and hematocrit (Hct) changes by measuring IE and EE, and apply it to some experimental in vivo measurements.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Joseph Chaiken ; Bin Deng ; Jerry Goodisman ; George Shaheen and Rebecca J. Bussjager
"Analyzing near-infrared scattering from human skin to monitor changes in hematocrit", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(9), 097005 (September 02, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3625283


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