Research Papers: Imaging

Isolating the sources of widespread physiological fluctuations in functional near-infrared spectroscopy signals

[+] Author Affiliations
Yunjie Tong

McLean Hospital, Brain Imaging Center, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 02478

Harvard University Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

University of Maastricht, Department of Psychology, Maastricht, The Netherlands

Lia Maria Hocke

McLean Hospital, Brain Imaging Center, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 02478

University of Maastricht, Department of Psychology, Maastricht, The Netherlands

Blaise deB. Frederick

McLean Hospital, Brain Imaging Center, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 02478

Harvard University Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(10), 106005 (October 14, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3638128
History: Received May 11, 2011; Revised August 04, 2011; Accepted August 22, 2011; Published October 14, 2011; Online October 14, 2011
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Physiological fluctuations at low frequency (<0.1 Hz) are prominent in functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) measurements in both resting state and functional task studies. In this study, we used the high spatial resolution and full brain coverage of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to understand the origins and commonalities of these fluctuations. Specifically, we applied a newly developed method, regressor interpolation at progressive time delays, to analyze concurrently recorded fNIRS and fMRI data acquired both in a resting state study and in a finger tapping study. The method calculates the voxelwise correlations between blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI and fNIRS signals with different time shifts and localizes the areas in the brain that highly correlate with the fNIRS signal recorded at the surface of the head. The results show the wide spatial distribution of this physiological fluctuation in BOLD data, both in task and resting states. The brain areas that are highly correlated with global physiological fluctuations observed by fNIRS have a pattern that resembles the venous system of the brain, indicating the blood fluctuation from veins on the brain surface might strongly contribute to the overall fNIRS signal.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Yunjie Tong ; Lia Maria Hocke and Blaise deB. Frederick
"Isolating the sources of widespread physiological fluctuations in functional near-infrared spectroscopy signals", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(10), 106005 (October 14, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3638128


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