Research Papers: General

Time-resolved study of the mechanical response of tissue phantoms to nanosecond laser pulses

[+] Author Affiliations
Francisco G. Pérez-Gutiérrez

Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Facultad de Ingeniería, Dr. Manuel Nava # 8, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. C.P. 78209, México

Santiago Camacho-López

Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada, Departamento de Óptica, Carretera Ensenada – Tijuana 3918, Zona Playitas, Ensenada, B.C., C.P. 22860, México

Guillermo Aguilar

University of California, Riverside, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, California 92521

Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV) del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Campus Querétaro, México

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(11), 115001 (October 26, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3644380
History: Received July 19, 2011; Revised September 06, 2011; Accepted September 08, 2011; Published October 26, 2011; Online October 26, 2011
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We present a time-resolved study of the interaction of nanosecond laser pulses with tissue phantoms. When a laser pulse interacts with a material, optical energy is absorbed by a combination of linear (heat generation and thermoelastic expansion) and nonlinear absorption (expanding plasma), according to both the laser light irradiance and material properties. The objective is to elucidate the contribution of linear and nonlinear optical absorption to bubble formation. Depending on the local temperatures and pressures reached, both interactions may lead to the formation of bubbles. We discuss three experimental approaches: piezoelectric sensors, time-resolved shadowgraphy, and time-resolved interferometry, to follow the formation of bubbles and measure the pressure originated by 6 ns laser pulses interacting with tissue phantoms. We studied the bubble formation and pressure transients for varying linear optical absorption and for radiant exposures above and below threshold for bubble formation. We report a rapid decay (of 2 orders of magnitude) of the laser-induced mechanical pressure measured (by time-resolved shadowgraphy) very close to the irradiation spot and beyond 1 mm from the irradiation site (by the piezoelectric sensor). Through time-resolved interferometry measurements, we determined that bubble formation can occur at marginal temperature increments as low as 3°C.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Francisco G. Pérez-Gutiérrez ; Santiago Camacho-López and Guillermo Aguilar
"Time-resolved study of the mechanical response of tissue phantoms to nanosecond laser pulses", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(11), 115001 (October 26, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3644380


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