Research Papers: Imaging

Evaluating the use of optical coherence tomography for the detection of epithelial cancers in vitro

[+] Author Affiliations
Louise E. Smith

University of Sheffield, Kroto Research Institute, Department of Engineering Materials, North Campus, Broad Lane, Sheffield, S3 7HQ, United Kingdom

University of South Australia, Mawson Institute, Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes Boulevard, Mawson Lakes, 5095, Australia

Vanessa Hearnden

University of Sheffield, Kroto Research Institute, Department of Engineering Materials, North Campus, Broad Lane, Sheffield, S3 7HQ, United Kingdom

University of Sheffield, School of Clinical Dentistry, Academic Unit of Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine and Surgery, Sheffield, S10 2TA, United Kingdom

Zenghai Lu, Stephen J. Matcher, Sheila MacNeil

University of Sheffield, Kroto Research Institute, Department of Engineering Materials, North Campus, Broad Lane, Sheffield, S3 7HQ, United Kingdom

Rod Smallwood

University of Sheffield, Department of Computer Science, Regent Court, 211 Portobello, Sheffield S1 4DP, United Kingdom

Keith D. Hunter

University of Sheffield, School of Clinical Dentistry, Academic Unit of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Sheffield, S10 2TA, United Kingdom

Martin H. Thornhill, Craig Murdoch

University of Sheffield, School of Clinical Dentistry, Academic Unit of Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine and Surgery, Sheffield, S10 2TA, United Kingdom

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(11), 116015 (October 27, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3652708
History: Received April 01, 2011; Revised September 02, 2011; Accepted September 22, 2011; Published October 27, 2011; Online October 27, 2011
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Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging methodology that is able to image tissue to depths of over 1 mm. Many epithelial conditions, such as melanoma and oral cancers, require an invasive biopsy for diagnosis. A noninvasive, real-time, point of care method of imaging depth-resolved epithelial structure could greatly improve early diagnosis and long-term monitoring in patients. Here, we have used tissue-engineered (TE) models of normal skin and oral mucosa to generate models of melanoma and oral cancer. We have used these to determine the ability of OCT to image epithelial differences in vitro. We report that while in vivo OCT gives reasonable depth information for both skin and oral mucosa, in vitro the information provided is less detailed but still useful. OCT can provide reassurance on the development of TE models of skin and oral mucosa as they develop in vitro. OCT was able to detect the gross alteration in the epithelium of skin and mucosal models generated with malignant cell lines but was less able to detect alteration in the epithelium of TE models that mimicked oral dysplasia or, in models where tumor cells had penetrated into the dermis.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Louise E. Smith ; Vanessa Hearnden ; Zenghai Lu ; Rod Smallwood ; Keith D. Hunter, et al.
"Evaluating the use of optical coherence tomography for the detection of epithelial cancers in vitro", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(11), 116015 (October 27, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3652708


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