Research Papers: Imaging

Optical imaging of Tc-99m–based tracers: in vitro and in vivo results

[+] Author Affiliations
Antonello E. Spinelli

San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Medical Physics Department, Via Olgettina N. 60, Milan, Italy

National Institution for Insurance against Accidents at Works (INAIL), Ionizing Radiation Laboratory, Via Fontana Candida 1, I-00040, Monte Porzio Catone, Rome, Italy

University of Verona, Department of Neurological, Neuropsychological, Morphological and Motor Sciences, Strada Le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona, Italy

Sergio Lo Meo

National Institution for Insurance against Accidents at Works (INAIL), Ionizing Radiation Laboratory, Via Fontana Candida 1, I-00040, Monte Porzio Catone, Rome, Italy

Riccardo Calandrino

San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Medical Physics Department, Via Olgettina N. 60, Milan, Italy

Andrea Sbarbati, Federico Boschi

University of Verona, Department of Neurological, Neuropsychological, Morphological and Motor Sciences, Strada Le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona, Italy

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(11), 116023 (November 02, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3653963
History: Received July 21, 2011; Revised September 28, 2011; Accepted September 29, 2011; Published November 02, 2011; Online November 02, 2011
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It has been recently shown that optical imaging (OI) methods can be used to image the in vivo biodistribution of several radiopharmaceuticals labeled with beta or alpha emitters. In this work particular attention has been focused on investigating the weaker optical signal induced by an almost pure gamma emitter like Tc-99m. Visible light emission measurements of a water solution containing Tc-99m were performed using a small animal OI system. A sequence of images was acquired for 24 h in order to study the decay of the luminescence signal. The difference between the luminescence decay half life and well-known Tc-99m half life was equal to 1%. in vivo imaging was performed by injecting one control nude mice with Tc-99m-MDP. Optical images obtained with equipment designed for bioluminescence imaging showed that a visible light emission was distinguishable and correctly localized in the bladder region where a higher concentration of Tc-99m-MDP was expected. The bladder to background ratio was always greater than 1. We conclude that the experimental data presented in this paper show that it is possible to detect in vivo luminescence optical photons induced by Tc-99m. This is important especially considering the large number of Tc-99m–based radiopharmaceutical currently available.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Antonello E. Spinelli ; Sergio Lo Meo ; Riccardo Calandrino ; Andrea Sbarbati and Federico Boschi
"Optical imaging of Tc-99m–based tracers: in vitro and in vivo results", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(11), 116023 (November 02, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3653963


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