0
Research Papers: Therapeutic

Spatial extent of cochlear infrared neural stimulation determined by tone-on-light masking

[+] Author Affiliations
Agnella Izzo Matic

Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, 303 E. Chicago Avenue, Searle 12-561, Chicago, Illinois 60611

Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2145 Sheridan Road, Tech E310, Evanston, Illinois 60208

Joseph T. Walsh

Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2145 Sheridan Road, Tech E310, Evanston, Illinois 60208

Claus-Peter Richter

Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, 303 E. Chicago Avenue, Searle 12-561, Chicago, Illinois 60611

Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2145 Sheridan Road, Tech E310, Evanston, Illinois 60208

Northwestern University, The Hugh Knowles Center, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Evanston, Illinois 60208

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(11), 118002 (August 02, 2011October 04, 2011October 04, 2011November 03, 2011November 03, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3655590
History: Received August 02, 2011; Revised October 04, 2011; Accepted October 04, 2011; Published November 03, 2011; Online November 03, 2011
Text Size: A A A

Artificial neural stimulation is widely used in clinic, rehabilitation, and research. One of the limitations of electrical stimulation is the current spread in tissue. Recently, pulsed mid-infrared laser stimulation of nerves has been investigated as an alternative stimulation method. The likely benefits of infrared neural stimulation (INS) include spatial selectivity of stimulation, noncontact mode of operation, and the lack of stimulation artifact in simultaneous electrical recordings. The hypothesis for this study is that INS of the cochlear spiral ganglion at low pulse energy is as spatially selective as low-level tonal stimulation of the cochlea. Spatial selectivity was measured using a masking method. An optical pulse with fixed optical parameters was delivered through a 200-μm diameter optical fiber. An acoustic tone, variable in frequency and level, was presented simultaneously with the optical pulse. Tone-on-light masking in gerbils revealed tuning curves with best frequencies between 5.3 and 11.4 kHz. The width of the tone-on-light tuning curves was similar to the width of tone-on-tone tuning curves. The results indicate that the spatial area of INS in the gerbil cochlea is similar to the cochlear area excited by a low level acoustic tone, showing promising results for future use of INS in implantable cochlear prostheses.

Figures in this Article
© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Agnella Izzo Matic ; Joseph T. Walsh, Jr. and Claus-Peter Richter
"Spatial extent of cochlear infrared neural stimulation determined by tone-on-light masking", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(11), 118002 (August 02, 2011October 04, 2011October 04, 2011November 03, 2011November 03, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3655590


Access This Article
Sign In to Access Full Content
Please Wait... Processing your request... Please Wait.
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
 
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In to Access Full Content

Tables

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement

Buy this article ($18 for members, $25 for non-members).
Sign In