Research Papers: General

Ray-tracing optical modeling of negative dysphotopsia

[+] Author Affiliations
Xin Hong, Yueai Liu, Mutlu Karakelle

Alcon Laboratories, 6201 South Freeway, Fort Worth, Texas 76134

Samuel Masket, Nicole R. Fram

Jules Stein Eye Institute, UCLA Center for Health Sciences, 100 Stein Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(12), 125001 (November 22, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3656745
History: Received May 19, 2011; Revised September 13, 2011; Accepted October 05, 2011; Published November 22, 2011; Online November 22, 2011
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Negative dysphotopsia is a relatively common photic phenomenon that may occur after implantation of an intraocular lens. The etiology of negative dysphotopsia is not fully understood. In this investigation, optical modeling was developed using nonsequential-component Zemax ray-tracing technology to simulate photic phenomena experienced by the human eye. The simulation investigated the effects of pupil size, capsulorrhexis size, and bag diffusiveness. Results demonstrated the optical basis of negative dysphotopsia. We found that photic structures were mainly influenced by critical factors such as the capsulorrhexis size and the optical diffusiveness of the capsular bag. The simulations suggested the hypothesis that the anterior capsulorrhexis interacting with intraocular lens could induce negative dysphotopsia.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Xin Hong ; Yueai Liu ; Mutlu Karakelle ; Samuel Masket and Nicole R. Fram
"Ray-tracing optical modeling of negative dysphotopsia", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(12), 125001 (November 22, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3656745


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