Research Papers: Sensing

Exhaled nitric oxide monitoring by quantum cascade laser: comparison with chemiluminescent and electrochemical sensors

[+] Author Affiliations
Julien Mandon, Frans J. M. Harren, Simona M. Cristescu

Radboud University, Life Science Trace Gas Facility, Molecular and Laser Physics, Institute for Molecules and Materials, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Marieann Högman

Uppsala University and Centre for Research and Development, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, SE 801 88 Gävle, Sweden

Peter J. F. M. Merkus

Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Jan van Amsterdam

Laboratory for Health Protection Research, RIVM, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands

J. Biomed. Opt. 17(1), 017003 (Feb 01, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.17.1.017003
History: Received August 24, 2011; Revised November 11, 2011; Accepted November 14, 2011
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Abstract.  Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is considered an indicator in the diagnostics and management of asthma. In this study we present a laser-based sensor for measuring FENO. It consists of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) combined with a multi-pass cell and wavelength modulation spectroscopy for the detection of NO at the sub-part-per-billion by volume (ppbv, 1109) level. The characteristics and diagnostic performance of the sensor were assessed. A detection limit of 0.5 ppbv was demonstrated with a relatively simple design. The QCL-based sensor was compared with two market sensors, a chemiluminescent analyzer (NOA 280, Sievers) and a portable hand-held electrochemical analyzer (MINO®, Aerocrine AB, Sweden). FENO from 20 children diagnosed with asthma and treated with inhaled corticosteroids were measured. Data were found to be clinically acceptable within 1.1 ppbv between the QCL-based sensor and chemiluminescent sensor and within 1.7 ppbv when compared to the electrochemical sensor. The QCL-based sensor was tested on healthy subjects at various expiratory flow rates for both online and offline sampling procedures. The extended NO parameters, i.e. the alveolar region, airway wall, diffusing capacity, and flux were calculated and showed a good agreement with the previously reported values.

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© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Julien Mandon ; Marieann Högman ; Peter J. F. M. Merkus ; Jan van Amsterdam ; Frans J. M. Harren, et al.
"Exhaled nitric oxide monitoring by quantum cascade laser: comparison with chemiluminescent and electrochemical sensors", J. Biomed. Opt. 17(1), 017003 (Feb 01, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.17.1.017003


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