Special Section on Endomicroscopy Technologies and Biomedical Applications

In vivo near-infrared dual-axis confocal microendoscopy in the human lower gastrointestinal tract

[+] Author Affiliations
Wibool Piyawattanametha

Stanford University, James H. Clark Center for Biomedical Engineering & Sciences, Departments of Pediatrics, Radiology and Microbiology & Immunology, Molecular Imaging Program. Stanford, California 94305

National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, Pathumthani, Thailand 12120

Chulalongkorn University, Advanced Imaging Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Pathumwan, Thailand 10330

Hyejun Ra, Kevin Loewke, Michael J. Mandella, Christopher H. Contag

Stanford University, James H. Clark Center for Biomedical Engineering & Sciences, Departments of Pediatrics, Radiology and Microbiology & Immunology, Molecular Imaging Program. Stanford, California 94305

Zhen Qiu, Thomas D. Wang

University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

Shai Friedland

Stanford University, Palo Alto Veterans Hospital, Stanford, California 94305

Jonathan T. C. Liu

Stanford University, Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford, California 94305

Gordon S. Kino, Olav Solgaard

Stony Brook University (SUNY), Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook, NY 11794

J. Biomed. Opt. 17(2), 021102 (Mar 02, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.17.2.021102
History: Received July 4, 2011; Revised September 9, 2011; Accepted September 9, 2011
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Abstract.  Near-infrared confocal microendoscopy is a promising technique for deep in vivo imaging of tissues and can generate high-resolution cross-sectional images at the micron-scale. We demonstrate the use of a dual-axis confocal (DAC) near-infrared fluorescence microendoscope with a 5.5-mm outer diameter for obtaining clinical images of human colorectal mucosa. High-speed two-dimensional en face scanning was achieved through a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner while a micromotor was used for adjusting the axial focus. In vivo images of human patients are collected at 5frames/sec with a field of view of 362×212μm2 and a maximum imaging depth of 140 μm. During routine endoscopy, indocyanine green (ICG) was topically applied a nonspecific optical contrasting agent to regions of the human colon. The DAC microendoscope was then used to obtain microanatomic images of the mucosa by detecting near-infrared fluorescence from ICG. These results suggest that DAC microendoscopy may have utility for visualizing the anatomical and, perhaps, functional changes associated with colorectal pathology for the early detection of colorectal cancer.

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© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Wibool Piyawattanametha ; Hyejun Ra ; Zhen Qiu ; Shai Friedland ; Jonathan T. C. Liu, et al.
"In vivo near-infrared dual-axis confocal microendoscopy in the human lower gastrointestinal tract", J. Biomed. Opt. 17(2), 021102 (Mar 02, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.17.2.021102


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