Research Papers: Imaging

Use of near-infrared luminescent gold nanoclusters for detection of macrophages

[+] Author Affiliations
Veronika Sapozhnikova

University of Texas Health Science, Center at San Antonio, Departments of Medicine and Pathology, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, 78229 Texas

Brian Willsey, Li Leo Ma, Keith Johnston

University of Texas at Austin, Department of Chemical Engineering, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, 78712 Texas

Reto Asmis

University of Texas Health Science, Center at San Antonio, Departments of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Biochemistry, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, 78229 Texas

Tianyi Wang

University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 1 University Station, C0800, Austin, 78712-1084 Texas

James Travis Jenkins, Jacob Mancuso

University of Texas Health Science, Center at San Antonio, Department of Medicine, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, 78229 Texas

Roman Kuranov

University of Texas Health Science, Center at San Antonio, Department of Ophthalmology, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, 78229 Texas

Thomas E. Milner

University of Texas at Austin, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, BME 1.108F, 1 University Station, C0800, Austin, 78712-1084 Texas

Marc D. Feldman

University of Texas Health Science, Center at San Antonio, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, Department of Medicine, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, 78229 Texas

J. Biomed. Opt. 17(2), 026006 (Mar 07, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.17.2.026006
History: Received July 17, 2011; Revised November 25, 2011; Accepted December 13, 2011
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Abstract.  We determined the effect of aggregation and coating thickness of gold on the luminescence of nanoparticles engulfed by macrophages and in gelatin phantoms. Thin gold-coated iron oxide nanoclusters (nanoroses) have been developed to target macrophages to provide contrast enhancement for near-infrared optical imaging applications. We compare the brightness of nanoroses luminescent emissions in response to 635 nm laser excitation to other nanoparticles including nanoshells, nanorods, and Cy5 conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles. Luminescent properties of all these nanoparticles were investigated in monomeric and aggregated form in gelatin phantoms and primary macrophage cell cultures using confocal microscopy. Aggregation of the gold nanoparticles increased luminescence emission and correlated with increased surface mass of gold per nanoparticle (nanoshells 37±14.30×103 brightness with 1.23×104 wt of gold (g)/nanoparticle versus original nanorose 1.45±0.37×103 with 2.10×1016 wt of gold/nanoparticle, p<0.05). Nanoshells showed greater luminescent intensity than original nanoroses or Cy5 conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles when compared as nanoparticles per macrophage (38±10 versus 11±2.8 versus 17±6.5, p<0.05, respectively, ANOVA), but showed relatively poor macrophage uptake (1025±128 versus 7549±236 versus 96,000nanoparticles/cell, p<0.05, student t-test nanoshells versus nanoroses). Enhancement of gold fluorescent emissions by nanoparticles can be achieved by reducing the thickness of the gold coating, by clustering the gold on the surface of the nanoparticles (nanoshells), and by clustering the gold nanoparticles themselves.

Figures in this Article
© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Veronika Sapozhnikova ; Brian Willsey ; Reto Asmis ; Tianyi Wang ; James Travis Jenkins, et al.
"Use of near-infrared luminescent gold nanoclusters for detection of macrophages", J. Biomed. Opt. 17(2), 026006 (Mar 07, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.17.2.026006


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