Research Papers: Imaging

Identifying brain neoplasms using dye-enhanced multimodal confocal imaging

[+] Author Affiliations
Dennis Wirth

University of Massachusetts, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, One University Avenue Lowell, Massachusetts 01854

Matija Snuderl, Matthew P. Frosch

Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Pathology, 55 Fruit Street, Warren 225, Boston, Massachusetts 02114

Sameer Sheth, Churl-Su Kwon, William Curry

Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, 55 Fruit Street, Gray 502, Boston, Massachusetts 02114

Anna N. Yaroslavsky

University of Massachusetts, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, One University Avenue Lowell, Massachusetts 01854

Harvard Medical School, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, BAR314B, Boston, Massachusetts 02114

J. Biomed. Opt. 17(2), 026012 (Feb 24, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.17.2.026012
History: Received September 28, 2011; Revised December 1, 2011; Accepted December 22, 2011
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Abstract.  Brain tumors cause significant morbidity and mortality even when benign. Completeness of resection of brain tumors improves quality of life and survival; however, that is often difficult to accomplish. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using multimodal confocal imaging for intraoperative detection of brain neoplasms. We have imaged different types of benign and malignant, primary and metastatic brain tumors. We correlated optical images with histopathology and evaluated the possibility of interpreting confocal images in a manner similar to pathology. Surgical specimens were briefly stained in 0.05mg/ml aqueous solution of methylene blue (MB) and imaged using a multimodal confocal microscope. Reflectance and fluorescence signals of MB were excited at 642 nm. Fluorescence emission of MB was registered between 670 and 710 nm. After imaging, tissues were processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. The results of comparison demonstrate good correlation between fluorescence images and histopathology. Reflectance images provide information about morphology and vascularity of the specimens, complementary to that provided by fluorescence images. Multimodal confocal imaging has the potential to aid in the intraoperative detection of microscopic deposits of brain neoplasms. The application of this technique may improve completeness of resection and increase patient survival.

Figures in this Article
© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Dennis Wirth ; Matija Snuderl ; Sameer Sheth ; Churl-Su Kwon ; Matthew P. Frosch, et al.
"Identifying brain neoplasms using dye-enhanced multimodal confocal imaging", J. Biomed. Opt. 17(2), 026012 (Feb 24, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.17.2.026012


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