Research Papers: Imaging

Application of a maximum likelihood algorithm to ultrasound modulated optical tomography

[+] Author Affiliations
Nam T. Huynh, Diwei He, Barrie R. Hayes-Gill, John A. Crowe, John G. Walker, Melissa L. Mather, Felicity R. A. J. Rose, Stephen P. Morgan

University of Nottingham, Electrical Systems and Optics Research Division, Faculty of Engineering Nottingham, NG7 2RD, United Kingdom

Nicholas G. Parker

University of Leeds, School of Food Science and Nutrition LS2 9JT, Leeds, United Kingdom

Newcastle University, School of Mathematics and Statistics, NE1 7RU, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom

Malcolm J. W. Povey

University of Leeds, School of Food Science and Nutrition LS2 9JT, Leeds, United Kingdom

J. Biomed. Opt. 17(2), 026014 (Mar 06, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.17.2.026014
History: Received July 25, 2011; Revised December 22, 2011; Accepted December 27, 2011
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Abstract.  In pulsed ultrasound modulated optical tomography (USMOT), an ultrasound (US) pulse performs as a scanning probe within the sample as it propagates, modulating the scattered light spatially distributed along its propagation axis. Detecting and processing the modulated signal can provide a 1-dimensional image along the US axis. A simple model is developed wherein the detected signal is modelled as a convolution of the US pulse and the properties (ultrasonic/optical) of the medium along the US axis. Based upon this model, a maximum likelihood (ML) method for image reconstruction is established. For the first time to our knowledge, the ML technique for an USMOT signal is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The ML method inverts the data to retrieve the spatially varying properties of the sample along the US axis, and a signal proportional to the optical properties can be acquired. Simulated results show that the ML method can serve as a useful reconstruction tool for a pulsed USMOT signal even when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is close to unity. Experimental data using 5 cm thick tissue phantoms (scattering coefficient μs=6.5cm1, anisotropy factor g=0.93) demonstrate that the axial resolution is 160 μm and the lateral resolution is 600 μm using a 10 MHz transducer.

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© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Nam T. Huynh ; Diwei He ; Barrie R. Hayes-Gill ; John A. Crowe ; John G. Walker, et al.
"Application of a maximum likelihood algorithm to ultrasound modulated optical tomography", J. Biomed. Opt. 17(2), 026014 (Mar 06, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.17.2.026014


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