Research Papers: Imaging

In vivo imaging of human burn injuries with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

[+] Author Affiliations
Ki Hean Kim

Pohang University of Science and Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang 790-784, Republic of Korea

Pohang University of Science and Technology, Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang 790-784, Republic of Korea

Mark C. Pierce

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854

Gopi Maguluri

Thorlabs Inc., 435 Route 206, Newton, New Jersey 07860

B. Hyle Park

UC Riverside, Department of Bioengineering, Riverside, California 92521

Sang June Yoon

Pohang University of Science and Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang 790-784, Republic of Korea

Martha Lydon

Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts 02114

Robert Sheridan

Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts 02114

Shriners Hospital for Children, Department of Surgery, Boston, Massachusetts 02114

Johannes F. de Boer

VU University, Institute for Lasers, Life and Biophotonics Amsterdam, Department of Physics and Astronomy, de Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands

J. Biomed. Opt. 17(6), 066012 (Jun 04, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.17.6.066012
History: Received November 28, 2011; Revised April 15, 2012; Accepted April 18, 2012
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Abstract.  The accurate determination of burn depth is critical in the clinical management of burn wounds. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) has been proposed as a potentially non-invasive method for determining burn depth by measuring thermally induced changes in the structure and birefringence of skin, and has been investigated in pre-clinical burn studies with animal models and ex vivo human skin. In this study, we applied PS-OCT to the in-vivo imaging of two pediatric burn patients. Deep and superficial burned skins along with contralateral controls were imaged in 3D. The imaging size was 8mm×6mm×2mm in width, length, and depth in the air respectively, and the imaging time was approximately 6 s per volume. Superficially burned skins exhibited the same layered structure as the contralateral controls, but more visible vasculature and reduced birefringence compared to the contralateral controls. In contrast, a deeply burned skin showed loss of the layered structure, almost absent vasculature, and smaller birefringence compared to superficial burns. This study suggested the vasculature and birefringence as parameters for characterizing burn wounds.

Figures in this Article
© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Ki Hean Kim ; Mark C. Pierce ; Gopi Maguluri ; B. Hyle Park ; Sang June Yoon, et al.
"In vivo imaging of human burn injuries with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography", J. Biomed. Opt. 17(6), 066012 (Jun 04, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.17.6.066012


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