Special Section on Pioneers in Biomedical Optics: F.F. Jöbsis

Near-infrared spectroscopy/imaging for monitoring muscle oxygenation and oxidative metabolism in healthy and diseased humans

[+] Author Affiliations
Takafumi Hamaoka

National Institute of Fitness and Sports, Department of Exercise Science, Shiromizu 1, Kanoya, 891-2393 Japan

Kevin K. McCully

University of Georgia, 115 Ramsey Center, 330 River Road, Athens, Georgia

Valentina Quaresima

University of L’Aquila, Department of Sciences and Biomedical Technologies, L’Aquila, 67100 Italy

Katsuyuki Yamamoto

Hokkaido University, Biomedical Systems Engineering Division of Bioengineering and Bioinformatics Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, North 14 West 9, Sapporo 060-0814, Japan

Britton Chance

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6059

J. Biomed. Opt. 12(6), 062105 (November 16, 2007). doi:10.1117/1.2805437
History: Received May 01, 2007; Revised July 06, 2007; Accepted July 16, 2007; Published November 16, 2007
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Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was initiated in 1977 by Jobsis as a simple, noninvasive method for measuring the presence of oxygen in muscle and other tissues in vivo. This review honoring Jobsis highlights the progress that has been made in developing and adapting NIRS and NIR imaging (NIRI) technologies for evaluating skeletal muscle O2 dynamics and oxidative energy metabolism. Development of NIRS/NIRI technologies has included novel approaches to quantification of the signal, as well as the addition of multiple source detector pairs for imaging. Adaptation of NIRS technology has focused on the validity and reliability of NIRS measurements. NIRS measurements have been extended to resting, ischemic, localized exercise, and whole body exercise conditions. In addition, NIRS technology has been applied to the study of a number of chronic health conditions, including patients with chronic heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, varying muscle diseases, spinal cord injury, and renal failure. As NIRS technology continues to evolve, the study of skeletal muscle function with NIRS first illuminated by Jobsis continues to be bright.

© 2007 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Takafumi Hamaoka ; Kevin K. McCully ; Valentina Quaresima ; Katsuyuki Yamamoto and Britton Chance
"Near-infrared spectroscopy/imaging for monitoring muscle oxygenation and oxidative metabolism in healthy and diseased humans", J. Biomed. Opt. 12(6), 062105 (November 16, 2007). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2805437


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