Research Papers: Sensing

Multiwavelength time-resolved detection of fluorescence during the inflow of indocyanine green into the adult’s brain

[+] Author Affiliations
Anna Gerega, Daniel Milej, Marcin Botwicz, Norbert Zolek, Michal Kacprzak, Beata Toczylowska, Roman Maniewski, Adam Liebert

Nalecz Institute of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering Polish Academy of Sciences, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw, Poland

Wojciech Weigl

Medical University of Warsaw, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, W. Lindleya 4, 02-005 Warsaw, Poland

Warsaw Praski Hospital, Department of Intensive Care and Anesthesiology, Solidarnosci 67, 03-401 Warsaw, Poland

Wojciech Wierzejski

Warsaw Praski Hospital, Department of Intensive Care and Anesthesiology, Solidarnosci 67, 03-401 Warsaw, Poland

Ewa Mayzner-Zawadzka

Medical University of Warsaw, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, W. Lindleya 4, 02-005 Warsaw, Poland

University of Warmia and Mazury, Department of Intensive Care and Anesthesiology, Oczapowskiego 2, 10-719 Olsztyn, Poland

J. Biomed. Opt. 17(8), 087001 (Aug 02, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.17.8.087001
History: Received January 2, 2012; Revised July 2, 2012; Accepted July 5, 2012
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Abstract.  Optical technique based on diffuse reflectance measurement combined with indocyanine green (ICG) bolus tracking is extensively tested as a method for clinical assessment of brain perfusion in adults at the bedside. Methodology of multiwavelength and time-resolved detection of fluorescence light excited in the ICG is presented and advantages of measurements at multiple wavelengths are discussed. Measurements were carried out: 1. on a physical homogeneous phantom to study the concentration dependence of the fluorescence signal, 2. on the phantom to simulate the dynamic inflow of ICG at different depths, and 3. in vivo on surface of the human head. Pattern of inflow and washout of ICG in the head of healthy volunteers after intravenous injection of the dye was observed for the first time with time-resolved instrumentation at multiple emission wavelengths. The multiwavelength detection of fluorescence signal confirms that at longer emission wavelengths, probability of reabsorption of the fluorescence light by the dye itself is reduced. Considering different light penetration depths at different wavelengths, and the pronounced reabsorption at longer wavelengths, the time-resolved multiwavelength technique may be useful in signal decomposition, leading to evaluation of extra- and intracerebral components of the measured signals.

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© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Anna Gerega ; Daniel Milej ; Wojciech Weigl ; Marcin Botwicz ; Norbert Zolek, et al.
"Multiwavelength time-resolved detection of fluorescence during the inflow of indocyanine green into the adult’s brain", J. Biomed. Opt. 17(8), 087001 (Aug 02, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.17.8.087001


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