Special Section on Optical Methods of Imaging in the Skin

In vivo assessment of human burn scars through automated quantification of vascularity using optical coherence tomography

[+] Author Affiliations
Yih Miin Liew, Robert A. McLaughlin, Peijun Gong

The University of Western Australia, School of Electrical, Electronic & Computer Engineering, Optical and Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Perth, WA 6009, Australia

Fiona M. Wood

Burns Service of Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Wellington Street, Perth, WA 6000, Australia

The University of Western Australia, Burn Injury Research Unit, School of Surgery, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Perth, WA 6009, Australia

David D. Sampson

The University of Western Australia, School of Electrical, Electronic & Computer Engineering, Optical and Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Perth, WA 6009, Australia

The University of Western Australia, Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation & Analysis, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Perth, WA 6009, Australia

J. Biomed. Opt. 18(6), 061213 (Nov 22, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.18.6.061213
History: Received August 31, 2012; Revised October 26, 2012; Accepted October 29, 2012
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Abstract.  In scars arising from burns, objective assessment of vascularity is important in the early identification of pathological scarring, and in the assessment of progression and treatment response. We demonstrate the first clinical assessment and automated quantification of vascularity in cutaneous burn scars of human patients in vivo that uses optical coherence tomography (OCT). Scar microvasculature was delineated in three-dimensional OCT images using speckle decorrelation. The diameter and area density of blood vessels were automatically quantified. A substantial increase was observed in the measured density of vasculature in hypertrophic scar tissues (38%) when compared against normal, unscarred skin (22%). A proliferation of larger vessels (diameter100μm) was revealed in hypertrophic scarring, which was absent from normal scars and normal skin over the investigated physical depth range of 600 μm. This study establishes the feasibility of this methodology as a means of clinical monitoring of scar progression.

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© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Yih Miin Liew ; Robert A. McLaughlin ; Peijun Gong ; Fiona M. Wood and David D. Sampson
"In vivo assessment of human burn scars through automated quantification of vascularity using optical coherence tomography", J. Biomed. Opt. 18(6), 061213 (Nov 22, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.18.6.061213


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