Special Section on Optical Methods of Imaging in the Skin

Background free imaging of upconversion nanoparticle distribution in human skin

[+] Author Affiliations
Zhen Song, Jiangbo Zhao, Dayong Jin, Andrei V. Zvyagin

Macquarie University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MQ Biofocus Research Centre, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia

Yuri G. Anissimov

Griffith University, School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, QLD, Australia

Andrei V. Nechaev

Lomonosov Moscow State University of Fine Chemical Technologies, HTBAS Department, 86 Vernadskogo Ave., Moscow, 119571, Russia

Annemarie Nadort

Macquarie University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MQ Biofocus Research Centre, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia

University of Amsterdam, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Academic Medical Center, P.O. Box 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Tarl W. Prow

The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Dermatology Research Centre, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Michael S. Roberts

The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Therapeutics Research Centre, Brisbane, QLD 4102, Australia

University of South Australia, School of Pharmacy & Medical Sciences, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia

J. Biomed. Opt. 18(6), 061215 (Nov 27, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.18.6.061215
History: Received August 31, 2012; Revised October 29, 2012; Accepted October 31, 2012
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Abstract.  Widespread applications of nanotechnology materials have raised safety concerns due to their possible penetration through skin and concomitant uptake in the organism. This calls for systematic study of nanoparticle transport kinetics in skin, where high-resolution optical imaging approaches are often preferred. We report on application of emerging luminescence nanomaterial, called upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), to optical imaging in skin that results in complete suppression of background due to the excitation light back-scattering and biological tissue autofluorescence. Freshly excised intact and microneedle-treated human skin samples were topically coated with oil formulation of UCNPs and optically imaged. In the first case, 8- and 32-nm UCNPs stayed at the topmost layer of the intact skin, stratum corneum. In the second case, 8-nm nanoparticles were found localized at indentations made by the microneedle spreading in dermis very slowly (estimated diffusion coefficient, Dnp=37×1012cm2·s1). The maximum possible UCNP-imaging contrast was attained by suppressing the background level to that of the electronic noise, which was estimated to be superior in comparison with the existing optical labels.

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© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Zhen Song ; Yuri G. Anissimov ; Jiangbo Zhao ; Andrei V. Nechaev ; Annemarie Nadort, et al.
"Background free imaging of upconversion nanoparticle distribution in human skin", J. Biomed. Opt. 18(6), 061215 (Nov 27, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.18.6.061215


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