Research Papers: Imaging

Ultrathin single-channel fiberscopes for biomedical imaging

[+] Author Affiliations
Angelique Kano, Andrew R. Rouse, Arthur F. Gmitro

University of Arizona, College of Optical Sciences and Department of Medical Imaging, Tucson, Arizona

J. Biomed. Opt. 18(1), 016013 (Jan 18, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.18.1.016013
History: Received August 13, 2012; Revised December 3, 2012; Accepted December 10, 2012
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Abstract.  Ultrathin flexible fiberscopes typically have separate illumination and imaging channels and are available in diameters ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 mm. Diameters can potentially be reduced by combining the illumination and imaging paths into a single fiberoptic channel. Single-channel fiberscopes must incorporate a system to minimize Fresnel reflections from air–glass interfaces within the common illumination and detection path. The Fresnel reflection at the proximal surface of the fiber bundle is particularly problematic. This paper describes and compares methods to reduce the background signal from the proximal surface of the fiber bundle. Three techniques are evaluated: (1) antireflective (AR)-coating the proximal face of the fiber, (2) incorporating crossed polarizers into the light path, and (3) a novel technique called numerical aperture sharing, whereby a portion of the image numerical aperture is devoted to illumination and a portion to detection.

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© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Angelique Kano ; Andrew R. Rouse and Arthur F. Gmitro
"Ultrathin single-channel fiberscopes for biomedical imaging", J. Biomed. Opt. 18(1), 016013 (Jan 18, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.18.1.016013


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