Research Papers: Imaging

Flux density calibration in diffuse optical tomographic systems

[+] Author Affiliations
Samir Kumar Biswas, Kanhirodan Rajan

Indian Institute of Science, Department of Physics, Bangalore, India

Ram M. Vasu

Indian Institute of Science, Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Bangalore, India

J. Biomed. Opt. 18(2), 026023 (Feb 19, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.18.2.026023
History: Received November 21, 2012; Revised January 15, 2013; Accepted January 31, 2013
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Abstract.  The solution of the forward equation that models the transport of light through a highly scattering tissue material in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using the finite element method gives flux density (Φ) at the nodal points of the mesh. The experimentally measured flux (Umeasured) on the boundary over a finite surface area in a DOT system has to be corrected to account for the system transfer functions (R) of various building blocks of the measurement system. We present two methods to compensate for the perturbations caused by R and estimate true flux density (Φ) from Umeasuredcal. In the first approach, the measurement data with a homogeneous phantom (Umeasuredhomo) is used to calibrate the measurement system. The second scheme estimates the homogeneous phantom measurement using only the measurement from a heterogeneous phantom, thereby eliminating the necessity of a homogeneous phantom. This is done by statistically averaging the data (Umeasuredhetero) and redistributing it to the corresponding detector positions. The experiments carried out on tissue mimicking phantom with single and multiple inhomogeneities, human hand, and a pork tissue phantom demonstrate the robustness of the approach.

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© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Samir Kumar Biswas ; Kanhirodan Rajan and Ram M. Vasu
"Flux density calibration in diffuse optical tomographic systems", J. Biomed. Opt. 18(2), 026023 (Feb 19, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.18.2.026023


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