Research Papers: Sensing

Disease quantification in dermatology: in vivo near-infrared spectroscopy measures correlate strongly with the clinical assessment of psoriasis severity

[+] Author Affiliations
Tanja Maria Greve

Spectroscopy and Physical Chemistry, LEO Pharma A/S, Ballerup, Denmark

Søren Kamp

Roskilde Hospital, Department of Dermatology, Roskilde, Denmark

University of Copenhagen, Health Sciences Faculty, Copenhagen, Denmark

Gregor B. E. Jemec

Roskilde Hospital, Department of Dermatology, Roskilde, Denmark

J. Biomed. Opt. 18(3), 037006 (Mar 18, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.18.3.037006
History: Received November 15, 2012; Revised January 30, 2013; Accepted February 19, 2013
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Abstract.  Accurate documentation of disease severity is a prerequisite for clinical research and the practice of evidence-based medicine. The quantification of skin diseases such as psoriasis currently relies heavily on clinical scores. Although these clinical scoring methods are well established and very useful in quantifying disease severity, they require an extensive clinical experience and carry a risk of subjectivity. We explore the opportunity to use in vivo near-infrared (NIR) spectra as an objective and noninvasive method for local disease severity assessment in 31 psoriasis patients in whom selected plaques were scored clinically. A partial least squares (PLS) regression model was used to analyze and predict the severity scores on the NIR spectra of psoriatic and uninvolved skin. The correlation between predicted and clinically assigned scores was R=0.94 (RMSE=0.96), suggesting that in vivo NIR provides accurate clinical quantification of psoriatic plaques. Hence, NIR may be a practical solution to clinical severity assessment of psoriasis, providing a continuous, linear, numerical value of severity.

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© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Tanja Maria Greve ; Søren Kamp and Gregor B. E. Jemec
"Disease quantification in dermatology: in vivo near-infrared spectroscopy measures correlate strongly with the clinical assessment of psoriasis severity", J. Biomed. Opt. 18(3), 037006 (Mar 18, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.18.3.037006


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