Research Papers: Imaging

Deep-penetration photoacoustic array imaging of calcifications

[+] Author Affiliations
Tsai-Chu Hsiao

National Tsing Hua University, Institute of Photonics Technologies, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan

Yao-Yu Cheng

National Tsing Hua University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan

Wan-Ting Tein, Shih-Bin Luo, De-Yi Chiou

Industrial Technology Research Institute, Electronics and Optoelectronics Research Laboratories, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan

Ren-Jei Chung

National Taipei University of Technology, Graduate Institute of Biotechnology, Taipei 106, Taiwan

Meng-Lin Li

National Tsing Hua University, Institute of Photonics Technologies, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan

National Tsing Hua University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan

J. Biomed. Opt. 18(6), 066002 (Jun 03, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.18.6.066002
History: Received December 28, 2012; Revised May 8, 2013; Accepted May 10, 2013
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Abstract.  Calcifications are one of the most important indicators for early breast cancer detection. We explore the feasibility of deep-penetration photoacoustic (PA) imaging of calcifications based on a medical ultrasound array imaging platform. Intralipid and chicken breast phantoms embedded with different-sized hydroxyapatite (HA) particles, which are the major components of calcifications, were imaged to verify the equipment’s capability and penetration depth for the visualization of calcifications. An optimal near-infrared excitation wavelength was selected to maximize PA signals of HAs, resulting in a better HA signal-to-blood ratio. We demonstrated that PA imaging is capable of visualizing 0.5-mm HA particles at a depth of 3 cm in chicken breast phantoms. The noise-equivalent penetration depth of the system for visualizing 0.5-mm HA particles in the human breast was estimated to be about 2.9 to 3.5 cm, which is clinically relevant as calcifications are usually found at a depth of 0.6 to 3.0 cm. Moreover, the feasibility of differentiating HA from blood by the PA spectroscopic technique was presented and the mechanism of the HA signal generation was discussed. The results show that PA imaging is a promising technique for real-time visualization of breast calcifications.

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© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Tsai-Chu Hsiao ; Yao-Yu Cheng ; Wan-Ting Tein ; Shih-Bin Luo ; De-Yi Chiou, et al.
"Deep-penetration photoacoustic array imaging of calcifications", J. Biomed. Opt. 18(6), 066002 (Jun 03, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.18.6.066002


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