Research Papers: Imaging

Effect of a mirror-like illusion on activation in the precuneus assessed with functional near-infrared spectroscopy

[+] Author Affiliations
Jan Mehnert

Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin NeuroImaging Center, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany

Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Stephanstrasse 1a, 04103 Leipzig, Germany

Institute of Technology, Department of Machine Learning, Franklinstrasse 28/29, 10587 Berlin, Germany

Korea University, Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713, Republic of Korea

Maddalena Brunetti

Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany

MEDIAN Klinik Berlin-Kladow, Kladower Damm 223, 14089 Berlin, Germany

Freie Universität, Departments for Education and Psychology, Habelschwerdter Allee 45, 14195 Berlin, Germany

Jens Steinbrink

Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin NeuroImaging Center, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany

Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany

Berlin Institute of Technology, Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology Berlin, Franklinstrasse. 28/29, 10587 Berlin, Germany

Michael Niedeggen

Freie Universität, Departments for Education and Psychology, Habelschwerdter Allee 45, 14195 Berlin, Germany

Christian Dohle

Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany

MEDIAN Klinik Berlin-Kladow, Kladower Damm 223, 14089 Berlin, Germany

University of Potsdam, Center of Rehabilitation Science, Am Neuen Palais 10, 14469 Potsdam, Germany

J. Biomed. Opt. 18(6), 066001 (Jun 03, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.18.6.066001
History: Received December 17, 2012; Revised May 6, 2013; Accepted May 15, 2013
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Abstract.  Mirror therapy is a therapy to treat patients with pain syndromes or hemiparesis after stroke. However, the underlying neurophysiologic mechanisms are not clearly understood. In order to determine the effect of a mirror-like illusion (MIR) on brain activity using functional near-infrared spectroscopy, 20 healthy right-handed subjects were examined. A MIR was induced by a digital horizontal inversion of the subjects’ filmed hand. Optodes were placed on the primary motor cortex (M1) and the occipito-parietal cortex (precuneus, PC). Regions of interest (ROI) were defined a priori based on previous results of similar studies and confirmed by the analysis of effect sizes. Analysis of variance of the ROI signal revealed a dissociated pattern: at the PC, the MIR caused a significant inversion of a hemispheric lateralization opposite to the perceived hand, independent of the moving hand. In contrast, activity in M1 showed lateralization opposite to the moving hand, but revealed no mirror effect. These findings extend our understanding on interhemispheric rivalry and indicate that a MIR is integrated into visuomotor coordination similar to normal view, irrespective of the hand that is actually performing the task.

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© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Jan Mehnert ; Maddalena Brunetti ; Jens Steinbrink ; Michael Niedeggen and Christian Dohle
"Effect of a mirror-like illusion on activation in the precuneus assessed with functional near-infrared spectroscopy", J. Biomed. Opt. 18(6), 066001 (Jun 03, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.18.6.066001


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