Research Papers: Sensing

Blood flow and oxygenation changes due to low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the cerebral cortex

[+] Author Affiliations
Rickson C. Mesquita

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Institute of Physics, Campinas, SP 13083-859, Brazil

Olufunsho K. Faseyitan, Amy Thomas, Joel H. Greenberg, Roy H. Hamilton

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Neurology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

Peter E. Turkeltaub

Georgetown University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Washington, DC

Erin M. Buckley, Meeri N. Kim, Arjun G. Yodh

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

Turgut Durduran

Mediterranean Technology Park, Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona), Spain

John A. Detre

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Neurology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

J. Biomed. Opt. 18(6), 067006 (Jun 11, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.18.6.067006
History: Received January 23, 2013; Revised May 6, 2013; Accepted May 7, 2013
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Abstract.  Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) modulates processing in the human brain and is therefore of interest as a treatment modality for neurologic conditions. During TMS administration, an electric current passing through a coil on the scalp creates a rapidly varying magnetic field that induces currents in the cerebral cortex. The effects of low-frequency (1 Hz), repetitive TMS (rTMS) on motor cortex cerebral blood flow (CBF) and tissue oxygenation in seven healthy adults, during/after 20 min stimulation, is reported. Noninvasive optical methods are employed: diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for blood flow and diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) for hemoglobin concentrations. A significant increase in median CBF (33%) on the side ipsilateral to stimulation was observed during rTMS and persisted after discontinuation. The measured hemodynamic parameter variations enabled computation of relative changes in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption during rTMS, which increased significantly (28%) in the stimulated hemisphere. By contrast, hemodynamic changes from baseline were not observed contralateral to rTMS administration (all parameters, p>0.29). In total, these findings provide new information about hemodynamic/metabolic responses to low-frequency rTMS and, importantly, demonstrate the feasibility of DCS/DOS for noninvasive monitoring of TMS-induced physiologic effects.

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© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Rickson C. Mesquita ; Olufunsho K. Faseyitan ; Peter E. Turkeltaub ; Erin M. Buckley ; Amy Thomas, et al.
"Blood flow and oxygenation changes due to low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the cerebral cortex", J. Biomed. Opt. 18(6), 067006 (Jun 11, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.18.6.067006


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