Research Papers: General

Tissue deoxygenation kinetics induced by prolonged hypoxic exposure in healthy humans at rest

[+] Author Affiliations
Thomas Rupp, Thomas Leti, Veronique A. Bricout, Patrick Levy, Bernard Wuyam, Samuel Verges

Joseph Fourier University & CHU Grenoble, HP2 Laboratory, F-38043, Grenoble, France

National Institute for Health and Medical Research, U1042, F-38043, Grenoble, France

Marc Jubeau, Guillaume Y. Millet

Joseph Fourier University & CHU Grenoble, HP2 Laboratory, F-38043, Grenoble, France

National Institute for Health and Medical Research, U1042, F-38043, Grenoble, France

Université de Lyon, F-42023, Saint-Etienne, France

Stephane Perrey

Montpellier-1 University, Movement To Health (M2H) Laboratory, Euromov, F-34090, Montpellier, France

J. Biomed. Opt. 18(9), 095002 (Sep 24, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.18.9.095002
History: Received January 21, 2013; Revised August 23, 2013; Accepted September 4, 2013
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Abstract.  This study aimed to investigate the effects of sustained hypoxic exposure on cerebral and muscle oxygenation and cardiorespiratory function at rest. Eleven healthy subjects inhaled a normobaric hypoxic (FiO2=0.12) or normoxic (FiO2=0.21) gas mixture for 4 h at rest, on two separated blinded sessions. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart rate variability (HRV), end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2), and oxygenation of quadriceps muscle, prefrontal and motor cortices assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) were measured continuously during each session. Acute mountain sickness symptoms were evaluated at the end of each session. During a hypoxic session, SpO2 reduction (13%) plateaued after 20 min, while deoxygenation pattern took 30 to 40 min at the cerebral sites to plateau (+5.3±1.6μMol of deoxygenated-hemoglobin). Deoxygenation was more pronounced in the cerebral cortex compared to the muscle (+2.1±2.3μMol of deoxygenated-hemoglobin), and NIRS-derived tissue perfusion index showed distinct profiles between the muscle (hypoperfusion) and the brain (hyperperfusion) with prolonged hypoxia. Changes in tissue oxygenation were not associated with cardiorespiratory responses (e.g., HRV, EtCO2) and altitude sickness symptom appearance during hypoxic sessions. These data demonstrate that sustained hypoxia elicits time delay in changes between arterial and tissue (especially cerebral) oxygenation, as well as a tissue-specific sensitivity.

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© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Topics

Tissues

Citation

Thomas Rupp ; Thomas Leti ; Marc Jubeau ; Guillaume Y. Millet ; Veronique A. Bricout, et al.
"Tissue deoxygenation kinetics induced by prolonged hypoxic exposure in healthy humans at rest", J. Biomed. Opt. 18(9), 095002 (Sep 24, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.18.9.095002


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