Special Section on Optical Coherence Tomography and Interferometry: Advanced Engineering and Biomedical Applications

Optical coherence tomography monitoring of enhanced skin optical clearing in rats in vivo

[+] Author Affiliations
Elina A. Genina, Alexey N. Bashkatov, Ekaterina A. Kolesnikova

Saratov State University, Department of Optics and Biophotonics, 83, Astrakhanskaya Street, Saratov 410012, Russia

Marina V. Basko

Saratov State Medical University, 112, Bolshaya Kazachia Street, Saratov 410012, Russia

Georgy S. Terentyuk

Saratov State University, Department of Optics and Biophotonics, 83, Astrakhanskaya Street, Saratov 410012, Russia

Saratov State Medical University, 112, Bolshaya Kazachia Street, Saratov 410012, Russia

Ulianovsk State University, 42, L. Tolstoy Street, Ulianovsk 432000, Russia

Valery V. Tuchin

Saratov State University, Department of Optics and Biophotonics, 83, Astrakhanskaya Street, Saratov 410012, Russia

Institute of Precise Mechanics and Control of RAS, 24, Rabochaya Street, Saratov 410028, Russia

University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4500, Oulu 90014, Finland

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(2), 021109 (Oct 08, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.2.021109
History: Received June 27, 2013; Revised September 4, 2013; Accepted September 10, 2013
Text Size: A A A

Abstract.  A comparative study of physical, chemical, and combined enhancement of transdermal transport of optical clearing agents (OCAs) is presented. As a physical enhancer of diffusivity, ultrasound (US) with a frequency 1 MHz and a power 1.1 W in the continuous mode was used, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was used as a chemical enhancer. OCA (glycerol and polyethylene glycol-400 in equal proportion) was topically applied to the rat skin in vivo as alone or as together with the enhancers. Monitoring of skin optical clearing was implemented using an optical coherence tomography. The results have shown that the attenuation coefficient of intact skin dermis after the application of US-DMSO-OCA, US-OCA (both for 4 min), and DMSO-OCA (for 20 min) combinations decreased approximately by 31%, 19%, and 5%, respectively, while OCA alone did not induce a noticeable clearing effect for 20 min. Control skin sites with removed epidermis were used for modeling the upper limit of dermis optical clearing, i.e., maximal degree of optical clearing, by using the studied enhancers. They demonstrated that the attenuation coefficient decreases by 32%, 30%, 17%, and 16% at the action of US-DMSO-OCA, US-OCA, DMSO-OCA, and OCA, respectively. It can be concluded that US-DMSO-OCA combination only allowed reaching the upper limit of skin optical clearing.

Figures in this Article
© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Elina A. Genina ; Alexey N. Bashkatov ; Ekaterina A. Kolesnikova ; Marina V. Basko ; Georgy S. Terentyuk, et al.
"Optical coherence tomography monitoring of enhanced skin optical clearing in rats in vivo", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(2), 021109 (Oct 08, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.2.021109


Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.