Research Papers: Therapeutic

Mineral loss and color change of enamel after bleaching and staining solutions combination

[+] Author Affiliations
Larissa Sgarbosa Napoleão de Araújo, Anderson Catelan

University of Campinas, Piracicaba Dental School, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Avenue Limeira, 901, Areião, 13414-903 Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil

Paulo Henrique dos Santos, Rodolfo Bruniera Anchieta

São Paulo State University, Araçatuba School of Dentistry, Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, R. José Bonifácio, 1193, Villa Mendonça, 16015-050 Araçatuba, São Paulo, Brazil

André Luiz Fraga Briso, Renato Herman Sundfeld

São Paulo State University, Araçatuba School of Dentistry, Department of Restorative Dentistry, R. José Bonifácio, 1193, Villa Mendonça, 16015-050 Araçatuba, São Paulo, Brazil

Ana Carolina Soares Fraga Zaze

Paranaense University, School of Dentistry, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Pç. Mascarenhas de Moraes, 4282, Centro, Umuarama, Parana 87502-210, Brazil

J. Biomed. Opt. 18(10), 108004 (Oct 28, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.18.10.108004
History: Received June 4, 2013; Revised September 19, 2013; Accepted October 2, 2013
Text Size: A A A

Abstract.  Pigments of food and beverages could affect dental bleaching efficacy. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate color change and mineral loss of tooth enamel as well as the influence of staining solutions normally used by adolescent patients undergoing home bleaching. Initial hardness and baseline color were measured on enamel blocks. Specimens were divided into five groups (n=5): G1 (control) specimens were kept in artificial saliva throughout the experiment (3 weeks); G2 enamel was exposed to 10% carbamide peroxide for 6 h daily, and after this period, the teeth were cleaned and stored in artificial saliva until the next bleaching session; and G3, G4, and G5 received the same treatments as G2, but after bleaching, they were stored for 1 h in cola soft drink, melted chocolate, or red wine, respectively. Mineral loss was obtained by the percentage of hardness reduction, and color change was determined by the difference between the data obtained before and after treatments. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and Fisher’s test (α=0.05). G3 and G5 showed higher mineral loss (92.96±5.50 and 94.46±1.00, respectively) compared to the other groups (p0.05). G5 showed high-color change (9.34±2.90), whereas G1 presented lower color change (2.22±0.44) (p0.05). Acidic drinks cause mineral loss of the enamel, which could modify the surface and reduce staining resistance after bleaching.

© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Larissa Sgarbosa Napoleão de Araújo ; Paulo Henrique dos Santos ; Rodolfo Bruniera Anchieta ; Anderson Catelan ; André Luiz Fraga Briso, et al.
"Mineral loss and color change of enamel after bleaching and staining solutions combination", J. Biomed. Opt. 18(10), 108004 (Oct 28, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.18.10.108004


Figures

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.