Special Section on Advanced Biomedical Imaging and Sensing

Single-virus tracking approach to reveal the interaction of Dengue virus with autophagy during the early stage of infection

[+] Author Affiliations
Li-Wei Chu, Yi-Lung Huang, Jin-Hui Lee, Wei-Jun Chen, Ya-Hsuan Lin, Jyun-Yu Chen, Rui Xiang

National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Biophotonics, Taipei, Taiwan

National Yang-Ming University, Biophotonics and Molecular Imaging Research Center, Taipei, Taiwan

Long-Ying Huang

National Yang-Ming University, Department and Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei, Taiwan

Chau-Hwang Lee

National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Biophotonics, Taipei, Taiwan

National Yang-Ming University, Biophotonics and Molecular Imaging Research Center, Taipei, Taiwan

Academia Sinica, Research Center for Applied Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan

Yueh-Hsin Ping

National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Biophotonics, Taipei, Taiwan

National Yang-Ming University, Department and Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei, Taiwan

National Yang-Ming University, Biophotonics and Molecular Imaging Research Center, Taipei, Taiwan

National Yang-Ming University, Infection and Immunity Research Center, Taipei, Taiwan

National Yang-Ming University, Cancer Research Center & VYM Genome Research Center, Taipei, Taiwan

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(1), 011018 (Nov 05, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.1.011018
History: Received April 26, 2013; Revised September 30, 2013; Accepted October 9, 2013
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Abstract.  Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the major infectious pathogens worldwide. DENV infection is a highly dynamic process. Currently, no antiviral drug is available for treating DENV-induced diseases since little is known regarding how the virus interacts with host cells during infection. Advanced molecular imaging technologies are powerful tools to understand the dynamics of intracellular interactions and molecular trafficking. This study exploited a single-virus particle tracking technology to address whether DENV interacts with autophagy machinery during the early stage of infection. Using confocal microscopy and three-dimensional image analysis, we showed that DENV triggered the formation of green fluorescence protein-fused microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) puncta, and DENV-induced autophagosomes engulfed DENV particles within 15-min postinfection. Moreover, single-virus particle tracking revealed that both DENV particles and autophagosomes traveled together during the viral infection. Finally, in the presence of autophagy suppressor 3-methyladenine, the replication of DENV was inhibited and the location of DENV particles spread in cytoplasma. In contrast, the numbers of newly synthesized DENV were elevated and the co-localization of DENV particles and autophagosomes was detected while the cells were treated with autophagy inducer rapamycin. Taken together, we propose that DENV particles interact with autophagosomes at the early stage of viral infection, which promotes the replication of DENV.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Li-Wei Chu ; Yi-Lung Huang ; Jin-Hui Lee ; Long-Ying Huang ; Wei-Jun Chen, et al.
"Single-virus tracking approach to reveal the interaction of Dengue virus with autophagy during the early stage of infection", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(1), 011018 (Nov 05, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.1.011018


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