Research Papers: Therapeutic

Effect of low-level laser treatment on cochlea hair-cell recovery after ototoxic hearing loss

[+] Author Affiliations
Chung-Ku Rhee, Phil-Sang Chung

Dankook University College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Cheonan 330-715, Republic of Korea

Dankook University College of Medicine, Medical Laser Research Center, Cheonan 330-715, Republic of Korea

Peijie He

Dankook University College of Medicine, Medical Laser Research Center, Cheonan 330-715, Republic of Korea

Fudan University, Affiliated Eye Ear Nose Throat Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Shanghai No.83, China

Jae Yun Jung

Dankook University College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Cheonan 330-715, Republic of Korea

Jin-Chul Ahn

Dankook University College of Medicine, Medical Laser Research Center, Cheonan 330-715, Republic of Korea

Min Young Lee, Myung-Whan Suh

Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul 110-744, Republic of Korea

J. Biomed. Opt. 18(12), 128003 (Dec 16, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.18.12.128003
History: Received July 18, 2013; Revised September 13, 2013; Accepted September 17, 2013
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Abstract.  The primary cause of hearing loss includes damage to cochlear hair cells. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has become a popular treatment for damaged nervous systems. Based on the idea that cochlea hair cells and neural cells are from same developmental origin, the effect of LLLT on hearing loss in animal models is evaluated. Hearing loss animal models were established, and the animals were irradiated by 830-nm diode laser once a day for 10 days. Power density of the laser treatment was 900mW/cm2, and the fluence was 162 to 194 J. The tympanic membrane was evaluated after LLLT. Thresholds of auditory brainstem responses were evaluated before treatment, after gentamicin, and after 10 days of LLLT. Quantitative scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations were done by counting remaining hair cells. Tympanic membranes were intact at the end of the experiment. No adverse tissue reaction was found. On SEM images, LLLT significantly increased the number of hair cells in middle and basal turns. Hearing was significantly improved by laser irradiation. After LLLT treatment, both the hearing threshold and hair-cell count significantly improved.

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© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Chung-Ku Rhee ; Peijie He ; Jae Yun Jung ; Jin-Chul Ahn ; Phil-Sang Chung, et al.
"Effect of low-level laser treatment on cochlea hair-cell recovery after ototoxic hearing loss", J. Biomed. Opt. 18(12), 128003 (Dec 16, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.18.12.128003


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