Research Papers: Sensing

Noninvasive monitoring of gas in the lungs and intestines of newborn infants using diode lasers: feasibility study

[+] Author Affiliations
Patrik Lundin, Gabriel Somesfalean, Stefan Andersson-Engels

Lund University, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden

Emilie Krite Svanberg

Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden

Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden

Lorenzo Cocola

Lund University, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden

CNR Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies–LUXOR, Via Trasea 7, IT-351 31 Padova, Italy

Märta Lewander Xu

Gasporox AB, Magistratsvägen 10, SE-226 43 Lund, Sweden

John Jahr

Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden

Vineta Fellman

Lund University, Department of Pediatrics, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden

Katarina Svanberg

Lund University, Department of Oncology, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden

South China Normal University, Center for Optical and Electromagnetic Research, Guangzhou CN-510006, China

Sune Svanberg

Lund University, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden

South China Normal University, Center for Optical and Electromagnetic Research, Guangzhou CN-510006, China

J. Biomed. Opt. 18(12), 127005 (Dec 20, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.18.12.127005
History: Received September 23, 2013; Revised November 21, 2013; Accepted November 22, 2013
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Abstract.  Preterm newborn infants have a high morbidity rate. The most frequently affected organs where free gas is involved are the lungs and intestines. In respiratory distress syndrome, both hyperexpanded and atelectatic (collapsed) areas occur, and in necrotizing enterocolitis, intramural gas may appear in the intestine. Today, these conditions are diagnosed with x-ray radiography. A bed-side, rapid, nonintrusive, and gas-specific technique for in vivo gas sensing would improve diagnosis. We report the use of noninvasive laser spectroscopy, for the first time, to assess gas content in the lungs and intestines of three full-term infants. Water vapor and oxygen were studied with two low-power diode lasers, illuminating the skin and detecting light a few centimeters away. Water vapor was easily detected in the intestines and was also observed in the lungs. The relatively thick chest walls of the infants prevented detection of the weaker oxygen signal in this study. However, results from a previous phantom study, together with scaling of the results presented here to the typical chest-wall thickness of preterm infants, suggest that oxygen also should be detectable in their lungs.

Figures in this Article
© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Patrik Lundin ; Emilie Krite Svanberg ; Lorenzo Cocola ; Märta Lewander Xu ; Gabriel Somesfalean, et al.
"Noninvasive monitoring of gas in the lungs and intestines of newborn infants using diode lasers: feasibility study", J. Biomed. Opt. 18(12), 127005 (Dec 20, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.18.12.127005


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