Research Papers: General

Radiative transfer equation for predicting light propagation in biological media: comparison of a modified finite volume method, the Monte Carlo technique, and an exact analytical solution

[+] Author Affiliations
Fatmir Asllanaj

Université de Lorraine, LEMTA, UMR 7563, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy 54518, France

Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, LEMTA, UMR 7563, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy 54518, France

Institut für Lasertechnologien in der Medizin und Meβtechnik an der Universität Ulm, Helmholtzstr.12, D-89081 Ulm, Germany

Sylvain Contassot-Vivier

Université de Lorraine, Loria UMR 7503 & AlGorille INRIA Project Team, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy 54506, France

André Liemert, Alwin Kienle

Institut für Lasertechnologien in der Medizin und Meβtechnik an der Universität Ulm, Helmholtzstr.12, D-89081 Ulm, Germany

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(1), 015002 (Jan 03, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.1.015002
History: Received October 18, 2013; Revised November 20, 2013; Accepted December 2, 2013
Text Size: A A A

Abstract.  We examine the accuracy of a modified finite volume method compared to analytical and Monte Carlo solutions for solving the radiative transfer equation. The model is used for predicting light propagation within a two-dimensional absorbing and highly forward-scattering medium such as biological tissue subjected to a collimated light beam. Numerical simulations for the spatially resolved reflectance and transmittance are presented considering refractive index mismatch with Fresnel reflection at the interface, homogeneous and two-layered media. Time-dependent as well as steady-state cases are considered. In the steady state, it is found that the modified finite volume method is in good agreement with the other two methods. The relative differences between the solutions are found to decrease with spatial mesh refinement applied for the modified finite volume method obtaining <2.4%. In the time domain, the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is used for the time semi-discretization of the radiative transfer equation. An agreement among the modified finite volume method, Runge-Kutta method, and Monte Carlo solutions are shown, but with relative differences higher than in the steady state.

Figures in this Article
© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Fatmir Asllanaj ; Sylvain Contassot-Vivier ; André Liemert and Alwin Kienle
"Radiative transfer equation for predicting light propagation in biological media: comparison of a modified finite volume method, the Monte Carlo technique, and an exact analytical solution", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(1), 015002 (Jan 03, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.1.015002


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.