Research Papers: Imaging

Retrospective respiration-gated whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography of mice

[+] Author Affiliations
Jun Xia

Washington University in St. Louis, Optical Imaging Lab, Department of Biomedical Engineering, One Brookings Drive, Saint Louis, Missouri 63130

Wanyi Chen

Washington University in St. Louis, Optical Imaging Lab, Department of Biomedical Engineering, One Brookings Drive, Saint Louis, Missouri 63130

Konstantin Maslov

Washington University in St. Louis, Optical Imaging Lab, Department of Biomedical Engineering, One Brookings Drive, Saint Louis, Missouri 63130

Mark A. Anastasio

Washington University in St. Louis, Optical Imaging Lab, Department of Biomedical Engineering, One Brookings Drive, Saint Louis, Missouri 63130

Lihong V. Wang

Washington University in St. Louis, Optical Imaging Lab, Department of Biomedical Engineering, One Brookings Drive, Saint Louis, Missouri 63130

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(1), 016003 (Jan 06, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.1.016003
History: Received October 6, 2013; Revised November 20, 2013; Accepted November 27, 2013
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Abstract.  Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging technique that has a great potential for preclinical whole-body imaging. To date, most whole-body PAT systems require multiple laser shots to generate one cross-sectional image, yielding a frame rate of <1Hz. Because a mouse breathes at up to 3 Hz, without proper gating mechanisms, acquired images are susceptible to motion artifacts. Here, we introduce, for the first time to our knowledge, retrospective respiratory gating for whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography. This new method involves simultaneous capturing of the animal’s respiratory waveform during photoacoustic data acquisition. The recorded photoacoustic signals are sorted and clustered according to the respiratory phase, and an image of the animal at each respiratory phase is reconstructed subsequently from the corresponding cluster. The new method was tested in a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system with a hardware-limited frame rate of 0.625 Hz. After respiratory gating, we observed sharper vascular and anatomical images at different positions of the animal body. The entire breathing cycle can also be visualized at 20frames/cycle.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Jun Xia ; Wanyi Chen ; Konstantin Maslov ; Mark A. Anastasio and Lihong V. Wang
"Retrospective respiration-gated whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography of mice", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(1), 016003 (Jan 06, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.1.016003


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