Research Papers: Imaging

Digital image correlation for full-field time-resolved assessment of arterial stiffness

[+] Author Affiliations
Adriaan Campo

University of Antwerp, Bimef, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp, Belgium

Joris Soons

University of Antwerp, Bimef, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp, Belgium

Hilde Heuten

University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, Belgium

Guy Ennekens

University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, Belgium

Inge Goovaerts

University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, Belgium

Christiaan Vrints

University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, Belgium

Pascal Lava

KaHo-St.Lieven, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Gebroeders De Smetstraat 1, 9000 Ghent, Belgium

Joris Dirckx

University of Antwerp, Bimef, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp, Belgium

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(1), 016008 (Jan 09, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.1.016008
History: Received April 30, 2013; Revised November 12, 2013; Accepted November 26, 2013
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Abstract.  Pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arterial system is a very important parameter to evaluate cardiovascular health. Currently, however, there is no golden standard for PWV measurement. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used for full-field time-resolved assessment of displacement, velocity, acceleration, and strains of the skin in the neck directly above the common carotid artery. By assessing these parameters, propagation of the pulse wave could be tracked, leading to a new method for PWV detection based on DIC. The method was tested on five healthy subjects. As a means of validation, PWV was measured with ultrasound (US) as well. Measured PWV values were between 3.68 and 5.19m/s as measured with DIC and between 5.14 and 6.58m/s as measured with US, with a maximum absolute difference of 2.78m/s between the two methods. DIC measurements of the neck region can serve as a test base for determining a robust strategy for PWV detection, they can serve as reference for three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction models, or they may even evolve into a screening method of their own. Moreover, full-field, time-resolved DIC can be adapted for other applications in biomechanics.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Adriaan Campo ; Joris Soons ; Hilde Heuten ; Guy Ennekens ; Inge Goovaerts, et al.
"Digital image correlation for full-field time-resolved assessment of arterial stiffness", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(1), 016008 (Jan 09, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.1.016008


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