Research Papers: Imaging

Network signatures of nuclear and cytoplasmic density alterations in a model of pre and postmetastatic colorectal cancer

[+] Author Affiliations
Dhwanil Damania, Hariharan Subramanian, Vadim Backman

Northwestern University, Biomedical Engineering Department, Evanston, Illinois 60208

Eric C. Anderson

Oregon Health & Science University, Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon 97239

Melissa H. Wong

Oregon Health & Science University, Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon 97239

Oregon Health & Science University, School of Medicine, Department of Cell & Developmental Biology, Portland, Oregon 97239

Oregon Health & Science University, School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Portland, Oregon 97239

Owen J. T. McCarty

Oregon Health & Science University, Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon 97239

Oregon Health & Science University, School of Medicine, Department of Cell & Developmental Biology, Portland, Oregon 97239

Oregon Health & Science University, School of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Portland, Oregon 97239

Kevin G. Phillips

Oregon Health & Science University, School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Portland, Oregon 97239

Oregon Health & Science University, School of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Portland, Oregon 97239

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(1), 016016 (Jan 20, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.1.016016
History: Received September 20, 2013; Revised December 6, 2013; Accepted December 13, 2013
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Abstract.  Cells contributing to the pathogenesis of cancer possess cytoplasmic and nuclear structural alterations that accompany their aberrant genetic, epigenetic, and molecular perturbations. Although it is known that architectural changes in primary and metastatic tumor cells can be quantified through variations in cellular density at the nanometer and micrometer spatial scales, the interdependent relationships among nuclear and cytoplasmic density as a function of tumorigenic potential has not been thoroughly investigated. We present a combined optical approach utilizing quantitative phase microscopy and partial wave spectroscopic microscopy to perform parallel structural characterizations of cellular architecture. Using the isogenic SW480 and SW620 cell lines as a model of pre and postmetastatic transition in colorectal cancer, we demonstrate that nuclear and cytoplasmic nanoscale disorder, micron-scale dry mass content, mean dry mass density, and shape metrics of the dry mass density histogram are uniquely correlated within and across different cellular compartments for a given cell type. The correlations of these physical parameters can be interpreted as networks whose nodal importance and level of connection independence differ according to disease stage. This work demonstrates how optically derived biophysical parameters are linked within and across different cellular compartments during the architectural orchestration of the metastatic phenotype.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Dhwanil Damania ; Hariharan Subramanian ; Vadim Backman ; Eric C. Anderson ; Melissa H. Wong, et al.
"Network signatures of nuclear and cytoplasmic density alterations in a model of pre and postmetastatic colorectal cancer", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(1), 016016 (Jan 20, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.1.016016


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