Research Papers: General

Laser-induced tissue fluorescence in radiofrequency tissue-fusion characterization

[+] Author Affiliations
Lei Su

Imperial College London, St. Mary’s Hospital, Department of Surgery and Cancer, London W2 1NY, United Kingdom

University of Liverpool, Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Liverpool L69 3GJ, United Kingdom

University of Liverpool, Department of Medicine, London W2 1NY, United Kingdom

Martina B. Fonseca

Imperial College London, St. Mary’s Hospital, Department of Surgery and Cancer, London W2 1NY, United Kingdom

University of Liverpool, Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Liverpool L69 3GJ, United Kingdom

Shobhit Arya

Imperial College London, St. Mary’s Hospital, Department of Surgery and Cancer, London W2 1NY, United Kingdom

Hiromi Kudo

Imperial College London, Department of Medicine, London W2 1NY, United Kingdom

Robert Goldin

Imperial College London, Department of Medicine, London W2 1NY, United Kingdom

George B. Hanna

Imperial College London, St. Mary’s Hospital, Department of Surgery and Cancer, London W2 1NY, United Kingdom

Daniel S. Elson

Imperial College London, St. Mary’s Hospital, Department of Surgery and Cancer, London W2 1NY, United Kingdom

University of Liverpool, Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Liverpool L69 3GJ, United Kingdom

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(1), 015007 (Jan 21, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.1.015007
History: Received July 31, 2013; Revised November 20, 2013; Accepted December 5, 2013
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Abstract.  Heat-induced tissue fusion is an important procedure in modern surgery and can greatly reduce trauma, complications, and mortality during minimally invasive surgical blood vessel anastomosis, but it may also have further benefits if applied to other tissue types such as small and large intestine anastomoses. We present a tissue-fusion characterization technology using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, which provides further insight into tissue constituent variations at the molecular level. In particular, an increase of fluorescence intensity in 450- to 550-nm range for 375- and 405-nm excitation suggests that the collagen cross-linking in fused tissues increased. Our experimental and statistical analyses showed that, by using fluorescence spectral data, good fusion could be differentiated from other cases with an accuracy of more than 95%. This suggests that the fluorescence spectroscopy could be potentially used as a feedback control method in online tissue-fusion monitoring.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Lei Su ; Martina B. Fonseca ; Shobhit Arya ; Hiromi Kudo ; Robert Goldin, et al.
"Laser-induced tissue fluorescence in radiofrequency tissue-fusion characterization", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(1), 015007 (Jan 21, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.1.015007


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