Research Papers: Sensing

Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of urine of healthy subjects and cervical cancer patients

[+] Author Affiliations
Ramu Rajasekaran

Anna University, Department of Medical Physics, Chennai 600025, India

Prakasa Rao Aruna

Anna University, Department of Medical Physics, Chennai 600025, India

Dornadula Koteeswaran

Meenakshi Ammal Dental College and Hospital, Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Chennai 600095, India

Ganesan Bharanidharan

Anna University, Department of Medical Physics, Chennai 600025, India

Munusamy Baludavid

Government Arignar Anna Memorial Cancer Hospital and Regional Cancer Center, Kancheepuram 631552, India

Singaravelu Ganesan

Anna University, Department of Medical Physics, Chennai 600025, India

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(3), 037003 (Mar 19, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.3.037003
History: Received October 4, 2013; Revised January 31, 2014; Accepted February 7, 2014
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Abstract.  Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy were employed in the discrimination of cervical cancer patients from healthy subjects using urine samples. Fluorescence emission at 390 and 440 nm was considered to monitor the fluorescence of indoxyl sulfate and neopterin. Significant spectral differences were observed between healthy and cancer subjects. Different ratio parameters were calculated from the spectral intensity at 280- and 350-nm excitation and were subjected to stepwise linear discriminant analysis. In total, 84.0% of samples were correctly classified at 280 nm and 96.4% were correctly classified at 350 nm. The fluorescence decay kinetics of urine samples at 390-nm emission was best described by bi- exponential fits, whereas the decay characteristics at 440 nm of urine samples was best explained by bi-exponential fits and, in some cases, by tri-exponential fits. However, the decay kinetics of both indoxyl sulfate and neopterin standards was well described by bi-exponential decays. Based on the fluorescence emission characteristics and statistical analysis, the fluorophores indoxyl sulfate, neopterin, and riboflavin may be considered as potential biomarkers for cervical cancer diagnosis.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Ramu Rajasekaran ; Prakasa Rao Aruna ; Dornadula Koteeswaran ; Ganesan Bharanidharan ; Munusamy Baludavid, et al.
"Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of urine of healthy subjects and cervical cancer patients", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(3), 037003 (Mar 19, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.3.037003


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