Research Papers: Sensing

Twenty-four-hour ambulatory recording of cerebral hemodynamics, systemic hemodynamics, electrocardiography, and actigraphy during people’s daily activities

[+] Author Affiliations
Quan Zhang

Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School Neural Systems Group, 13th Street, Building 149, Room 2651, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129

Center for Space Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas

Vladimir Ivkovic

Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School Neural Systems Group, 13th Street, Building 149, Room 2651, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129

Gang Hu

Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School Neural Systems Group, 13th Street, Building 149, Room 2651, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129

Gary E. Strangman

Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School Neural Systems Group, 13th Street, Building 149, Room 2651, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129

Center for Space Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(4), 047003 (Apr 28, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.4.047003
History: Received December 30, 2013; Revised March 1, 2014; Accepted March 5, 2014
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Abstract.  The feasibility and utility of wearable 24-h multimodality neuromonitoring during daily activities are demonstrated. We have developed a fourth-generation ambulatory near infrared spectroscopy device, namely NINscan 4. NINscan 4 enables recording of brain function (via cerebral hemodynamics), systemic hemodynamics, electrocardiography, and actigraphy simultaneously and continuously for up to 24 h at 250-Hz sampling rate, during (and with minor restriction to) daily activities. We present initial 24-h human subject test results, with example analysis including (1) comparison of cerebral perfusion and oxygenation changes during wakefulness and sleep over a 24-h period and (2) capturing of hemodynamic changes prior, during and after sudden waken up in the night during sleep. These results demonstrate the first ambulatory 24-h cerebral and systemic hemodynamics monitoring, and its unique advantages including long-term data collection and analysis capability, ability to catch unpredictable transient events during activities of daily living, as well as coregistered multimodality analysis capabilities. These results also demonstrate that NINscan 4’s motion artifact at 1-g head movement is smaller than physiological hemodynamic fluctuations during motionless sleep. The broader potential of this technology is also discussed.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Quan Zhang ; Vladimir Ivkovic ; Gang Hu and Gary E. Strangman
"Twenty-four-hour ambulatory recording of cerebral hemodynamics, systemic hemodynamics, electrocardiography, and actigraphy during people’s daily activities", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(4), 047003 (Apr 28, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.4.047003


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