Research Papers: Imaging

Deep optical imaging of tissue using the second and third near-infrared spectral windows

[+] Author Affiliations
Laura A. Sordillo

City College of the City University of New York, Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers, and Department of Physics, 160 Convent Avenue, New York 10031

Yang Pu

City College of the City University of New York, Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers, and Department of Physics, 160 Convent Avenue, New York 10031

Sebastião Pratavieira

City College of the City University of New York, Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers, and Department of Physics, 160 Convent Avenue, New York 10031

Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, São Carlos 05508-060, Brasil

Yury Budansky

City College of the City University of New York, Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers, and Department of Physics, 160 Convent Avenue, New York 10031

Robert R. Alfano

City College of the City University of New York, Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers, and Department of Physics, 160 Convent Avenue, New York 10031

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(5), 056004 (May 07, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.5.056004
History: Received March 4, 2014; Revised April 9, 2014; Accepted April 10, 2014
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Abstract.  Light at wavelengths in the near-infrared (NIR) region allows for deep penetration and minimal absorption through high scattering tissue media. NIR light has been conventionally used through the first NIR optical tissue window with wavelengths from 650 to 950 nm. Longer NIR wavelengths had been overlooked due to major water absorption peaks and a lack of NIR-CCD detectors. The second NIR spectral window from 1100 to 1350 nm and a new spectral window from 1600 to 1870 nm, known as the third NIR optical window, were investigated. Optical attenuation measurements from thin tissue slices of normal and malignant breast and prostate tissues, pig brain, and chicken tissue were obtained in the spectral range from 400 to 2500 nm. Optical images of chicken tissue overlying three black wires were also obtained using the second and third spectral windows. Due to a reduction in scattering and minimal absorption, longer attenuation lengths and clearer optical images could be seen in the second and third NIR optical windows compared to the conventional first NIR optical window. A possible fourth optical window centered at 2200 nm was noted.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Laura A. Sordillo ; Yang Pu ; Sebastião Pratavieira ; Yury Budansky and Robert R. Alfano
"Deep optical imaging of tissue using the second and third near-infrared spectral windows", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(5), 056004 (May 07, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.5.056004


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